Coverart for item
The Resource The Goals of Sustainable Development : Responsibility and Governance

The Goals of Sustainable Development : Responsibility and Governance

Label
The Goals of Sustainable Development : Responsibility and Governance
Title
The Goals of Sustainable Development
Title remainder
Responsibility and Governance
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Series statement
Approaches to Global Sustainability, Markets, and Governance Ser
The Goals of Sustainable Development : Responsibility and Governance
Label
The Goals of Sustainable Development : Responsibility and Governance
Link
http://libproxy.rpi.edu/login?url=https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/rpi/detail.action?docID=4932108
Publication
Copyright
Related Contributor
Related Location
Related Agents
Related Authorities
Related Subjects
Related Items
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Acknowledgements -- Contents -- Contributors -- 1 Responsibility and Governance in Achieving Sustainability -- Abstract -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 A Focus on Sustainability -- 1.3 Is Sustainability Sustainable? -- 1.4 Globalisation, Homogenisation and Convergence -- 1.5 Globalisation and Accounting -- 1.6 Responsibility and Governance in Sustainability -- References -- Theorising the Relationship -- 2 'People, Planet, Profits' and Perception Politics: A Necessary Fourth (and Fifth) Bottom Line? Critiquing the Current Triple Bottom Line in the Australian Context -- Abstract -- 2.1 Business, Politics, Society and the Natural Environment: The "Foursome" that Needs to Work -- 2.2 What Is Sustainable Development? and Who Actually Makes up This Foursome? -- 2.3 John Elkington and the Triple Bottom Line (TBL)-Who Is Really Responsible for Addressing Sustainable Development? -- 2.4 'Perception Politics': The Fourth and Fifth 'P'? -- 2.5 Why Examine the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) -- 2.6 In Greater Detail: Policy Responses to the GBR-the Australian Liberal Party (Liberal-National Coalition, LNC) -- 2.7 Conclusion -- References -- 3 CSR Management Strategies, Stakeholder Engagement and MNE Subsidiaries Efforts to Foster Sustainable Development -- Abstract -- 3.1 Introduction and Background -- 3.2 MNEs CSR Management Strategies -- 3.3 Research Method -- 3.4 Findings and Discussion -- 3.4.1 Propensity to Adopt Successful Local CSR Programmes -- 3.5 Limited Participation and Capacity Building of Local Subsidiaries -- 3.6 Limited Partnership with Local Enterprises -- 3.7 Inadequate Engagement of Stakeholders -- 3.8 Conclusion -- References -- 4 CSR, Stakeholders and Complexity: Seeking Certainty in Decision-Making -- Abstract -- 4.1 CSR and Increasing Awareness of Stakeholder Heterogeneity -- 4.2 Stakeholder Heterogeneity, Power and Innovation
  • 4.3 New Technologies, New Processes and New Stakeholders -- 4.4 CSR and Business Process in Complexity -- 4.5 Stakeholder Involvement in Decision-Making -- 4.6 Technology, Power, Control and Stakeholders -- 4.7 The Contest for Control: Performativity and Data -- 4.7.1 Organisational Tensions in Maintaining Control in Complexity -- 4.7.2 Performativity Between Institutions and Society -- 4.8 Decision-Making and Power: Big Data as a Response to Complexity -- 4.9 Power, Control and Knowledge -- 4.10 Conclusion -- References -- 5 Against Theory: Redefining Corporate Social Responsibility Using a Lacanian Perspective -- Abstract -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Through the Looking Glass and What We Found There -- 5.3 The Motivation of Managers -- 5.4 A Freudian Analysis-the Drive for Individuation -- 5.5 The Lacanian View-the Reassertion of the Individual -- 5.6 Myth Creation and Corporate Reporting -- 5.7 Conclusions -- References -- Developing Sustainability -- 6 Determinants Which Influence Purchase Behaviour of Energy Efficient Household Appliances in Emerging Markets -- Abstract -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Literature Review and Hypotheses Development -- 6.2.1 Knowledge -- 6.2.2 Environmental Attitudes -- 6.2.3 Personal Norms -- 6.2.4 Perceived Barriers -- 6.3 Research Method -- 6.3.1 Research Measures -- 6.3.2 Survey instrument translation and pre-testing -- 6.3.3 Participants and Procedure -- 6.4 Data Analysis -- 6.4.1 Reliability Analysis -- 6.4.2 Hypotheses Testing -- 6.5 Discussion and Implications -- 6.6 Conclusion and Future Research -- References -- 7 Improving Agricultural Water Sustainability: Strategies for Effective Farm Water Management and Encouraging the Uptake of Drip Irrigation -- Abstract -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 CSR, Environmental Responsibility and Water Sustainability -- 7.3 Drip Irrigation, Australia and Water Sustainable Agriculture
  • 7.4 Factors Affecting the Adoption of Innovative Farming Practise -- 7.4.1 Barriers to Innovation -- 7.4.1.1 Economic Barriers -- 7.4.1.2 Information Barriers -- 7.4.1.3 Cultural and Social Barriers -- 7.4.2 Agents of Change in Agricultural Practice -- 7.4.2.1 Research -- 7.4.2.2 Agricultural Extension Workers -- 7.4.2.3 Social Networks -- 7.5 Primary Qualitative Research with Various Agricultural Stakeholders -- 7.5.1 Findings -- 7.5.1.1 Farmers' Perceived Barriers to Drip -- 7.5.2 Dealers Reasons for not Using Drip -- 7.6 Discussion and Conclusions -- References -- 8 Interrelationship Between Solar Lighting and Poverty Alleviation in Rural Cambodia-A Case Study of Panasonic Corporation's Solar Lighting CSR Initiative -- Abstract -- 8.1 Global Energy Poverty -- 8.1.1 Introduction -- 8.1.2 Cambodia Context -- 8.2 Research Methodology -- 8.3 Solar Light Distribution -- 8.3.1 Solar LED Specifications -- 8.3.2 Distribution Procedure -- 8.4 Socio-Economic Characteristics of the Target Areas -- 8.4.1 Local Economy -- 8.4.2 Household Characteristics -- 8.4.3 Family Asset Ownership -- 8.4.4 Family Income and Expenditures -- 8.4.5 Identification of Major Socio-Economic Problems -- 8.4.6 Satisfaction Level -- 8.5 Baseline Energy Use Data -- 8.5.1 Main Source of Lighting -- 8.5.2 Average Monthly Energy Cost -- 8.6 Solar Lighting Use Assessment -- 8.6.1 Solar Benefit Identification -- 8.6.2 The Economic Impact -- 8.6.3 The Impact on Education -- 8.6.4 The Impact on Family Socialization -- 8.6.5 Linked Impacts on Future Income Generation, Health and the Environment and Information Access -- 8.7 Summary -- 8.8 Final Recommendations to Promote Solar Led Sustainability -- Acknowledgements -- References -- 9 An Exploration of Social Investment Discourses in the Oil and Gas Sector -- Abstract -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Contextualising O&G Social Investment
  • 9.3 Methodology -- 9.4 Theory -- 9.5 The Preliminary Findings -- 9.5.1 Working on Discourses -- 9.5.2 Working Around Discourses -- 9.5.3 Working for Discourses -- 9.5.4 Working with Discourses -- 9.6 Concluding Remarks -- References -- Organisational Perspectives -- 10 The Linkages Between CSR, Social Capital and Small Enterprise Development in a Large Company's Supply Chain -- Abstract -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 Literature Review and Theoretical Framework -- 10.3 Research Context -- 10.4 Reseach Approach -- 10.4.1 Case Selection -- 10.4.2 Data Collection, Data Analysis, and Theory Development -- 10.5 Research Findings -- 10.5.1 Sustainable Development and the MSME Development Program -- 10.5.2 The MSME Program Formulation and Implementation -- 10.5.3 The MSME Program and Social Capital Development -- 10.5.3.1 Development of Social Relationship and Capabilities of MSMEs -- 10.5.3.2 Embedded Resources for the MSME Program -- 10.5.3.3 Collective Actions for Common Goals -- 10.5.4 Social Capital and Corporate Sustainability -- 10.5.4.1 Economic Performance: Supply Chain Improvement -- 10.5.4.2 Social Performance: Prosperity for Many -- 10.5.4.3 Environmental Performance: Environmentally Friendly Business Practices -- 10.6 Conclusions and Implications -- References -- 11 Tobacco CSR and the Ethics Game Paradox: A Qualitative Approach for Evaluating Tobacco Brand Name Strategy Following Plain Packaging -- Abstract -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 Tobacco Regulation and Plain Packaging -- 11.2.1 The Plain Packaging Debate -- 11.3 Tobacco Brand Name Evolution and Branding's Significance After Plain Packaging -- 11.4 Proposed Research Approach for Investigating Tobacco Brand Names -- 11.4.1 The Qualitative Rationale -- 11.4.2 Proposed Areas of Evaluation -- 11.4.2.1 Colour Words -- 11.4.2.2 Abstract Descriptor Words -- 11.4.2.3 Family Brand Names
  • 11.4.2.4 Specific Brand Variant Names -- 11.4.3 Data Analysis -- 11.5 Chapter Discussion and Conclusion -- References -- 12 The Neo-Institutionalism Influences on Corporate Social Responsibility Reporting Development in Australia: A Three Company Study -- Abstract -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 Literature Review -- 12.2.1 Neo-Institutionalisation Framework -- 12.2.2 Symbolic Communication Strategies -- 12.3 Methodology -- 12.3.1 Data Collection -- 12.4 Results and Discussion -- 12.5 Macro -- 12.5.1 Coercive Pressures -- 12.5.1.1 Regulatory Pressure -- 12.5.1.2 Corporate Governance Statements -- 12.5.1.3 Stakeholder Pressure -- 12.5.1.4 Industry Associations -- 12.5.2 Mimetic Pressures -- 12.5.2.1 Global Reporting Indicators (GRI) -- 12.5.2.2 Independent Assurance -- 12.5.3 Normative Pressures -- 12.5.3.1 CSR in Business Education -- 12.5.3.2 Meso -- 'Stand-Alone' Sustainability Reporting -- 12.6 Micro -- 12.6.1 Communication Strategies -- 12.6.1.1 Impressions Management and Signalling -- 12.6.1.2 Managerial Capture -- 12.7 Conclusion -- References -- 13 Social Responsibility in Higher Educational Institutions: An Exploratory Study -- Abstract -- 13.1 Introduction -- 13.2 What Is University Social Responsibility and Why It Is Important? -- 13.3 A Management Model to Develop and Evaluate USR -- 13.4 The Practice of University Social Responsibility in Hispanic America -- 13.5 Methods -- 13.6 Findings and Discussion -- 13.7 Conclusions -- References -- 14 Shifting to Green: Insights from a SME Hotel's Green Approach in China -- Abstract -- 14.1 Introduction -- 14.2 Literature Review -- 14.2.1 Green -- 14.2.2 Barriers and Benefits to SMEs Going Green -- 14.2.3 Chinese Context -- 14.3 Research Method -- 14.3.1 Case Selection -- 14.4 Results -- 14.4.1 Perceptions and Definition of Green -- 14.4.2 Key Influential Stakeholders -- 14.4.3 Motivational Dimension
  • 14.4.4 Approach to Greenness (Marketing Position/Strategy)
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{'f': 'http://opac.lib.rpi.edu/record=b4393559'}
Extent
1 online resource (254 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789811050473
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote

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