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The Resource The Case for Repatriating China's Cultural Objects

The Case for Repatriating China's Cultural Objects

Label
The Case for Repatriating China's Cultural Objects
Title
The Case for Repatriating China's Cultural Objects
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
The Case for Repatriating China's Cultural Objects
Label
The Case for Repatriating China's Cultural Objects
Link
http://libproxy.rpi.edu/login?url=https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/rpi/detail.action?docID=4427871
Publication
Copyright
Related Contributor
Related Location
Related Agents
Related Authorities
Related Subjects
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Foreword -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- Contents -- A Note About Chinese Dynasties and Names -- Timeline of Chinese History -- Chinese Names and Romanization -- Abbreviations -- Terminology -- Cultural Heritage, Cultural Property, Cultural Objects, Cultural Relics, and Art -- Return, Restitution, Recovery, and Repatriation -- Introduction -- 1 The Loss of Cultural Relics in Modern Chinese History -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 The Social Background of the Loss -- 1.2.1 The Opium Wars -- 1.2.2 The Unequal Treaty System -- 1.2.3 Japanese Aggression Against China -- 1.3 Plunder During Times of War -- 1.3.1 The Sacking of the Old Summer Palace -- 1.3.2 The 1900 Plunder of Beijing -- 1.3.3 Japanese Pillage in the Second World War -- 1.4 Foreign Expeditions, Thefts and Exportations -- 1.4.1 The Loss of Dunhuang Cultural Relics -- 1.4.2 The Loss of Oracle Bones -- 1.5 Recovery Activities and Chapter Conclusion -- 1.5.1 Recovery Efforts -- 1.5.2 Conclusion -- 2 Law and Ethics Protecting Cultural Objects -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Protection of Cultural Objects During Times of War -- 2.2.1 From Antiquity to the Eighteenth Century -- 2.2.2 The Nineteenth Century -- 2.2.3 The Two World Wars -- 2.2.4 The Post-War Legal Regime -- 2.3 Protection of Cultural Objects Against Illicit Trafficking -- 2.3.1 International Conventions -- 2.3.1.1 The 1970 UNESCO Convention -- 2.3.1.2 The 1995 UNITROIT Convention -- 2.3.2 Chinese Legislation Protecting Cultural Relics -- 2.3.2.1 Rules for Archaeological Excavation -- 2.3.2.2 Antiquities Export Control -- 2.4 Soft Laws Protecting Cultural Objects -- 2.4.1 Ethical Guidelines Regarding Illicit Trafficking in Cultural Objects -- 2.4.2 Ethics of Restitution of Cultural Objects -- 2.4.2.1 Restitution of Nazi Looted Art -- 2.4.2.2 General Assembly and UNESCO Resolutions -- 2.5 Chapter Conclusion
  • 3 Restitution Through International Adjudication: Looted Cultural Objects Case Studies -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Are States Responsible for Restitution? -- 3.2.1 The Doctrine of Intertemporal Law -- 3.2.2 International Conventions -- 3.2.3 International Customary Law -- 3.2.4 General Principles of Law -- 3.3 Admissibility of the Restitution Claims -- 3.3.1 Settlement by Post-war Peace Treaties -- 3.3.2 The Principle of Extinctive Prescription -- 3.3.3 Legal Effects of the Resolutions -- 3.4 Conclusion -- 4 Restitution Through Civil Litigation: A Case Study of the Dunhuang Manuscripts -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Characterization of the Cause of Action and Proof of Title -- 4.2.1 Trespass to Chattels and Conversion -- 4.2.2 Had the Claimant Acquired the Title? -- 4.3 The Deprivation and Its Effects -- 4.3.1 Choice of Law -- 4.3.2 Application of Chinese Law -- 4.3.3 Exclusion of Chinese Law -- 4.4 Has the Possessor Acquired the Title? -- 4.4.1 Effects of the Lapse of Time -- 4.4.1.1 Theft Under English Law -- 4.4.1.2 A Purchaser in Good Faith -- 4.4.2 Choice of Limitation Law -- 4.4.2.1 Classification of the Limitation: Procedural or Substantive? -- 4.4.2.2 Chinese Statue of Limitation -- 4.4.2.3 Conflict of Limitation Laws in Time -- 4.5 Conclusion -- 5 Cultural Identity: The Politics of Recognition -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Cultural Objects as Instruments to Identity -- 5.2.1 Culture and Identity -- 5.2.2 The Power of Possession: Authenticity -- 5.2.3 Who 'Owns' Cultural Objects? -- 5.2.3.1 States and Cultures -- 5.2.3.2 Countries of Origin and Cultural Objects -- 5.3 Recognition of Cultural Identity -- 5.3.1 The Politics of Recognition and Multiculturalism -- 5.3.2 Interpretation of Recognition of Cultural Identity in Disputes over Colonial Heritage -- 5.4 A Cosmopolitan View -- 5.4.1 Universal Museums -- 5.4.2 Balance of the Interests
  • 5.5 Conclusion -- 6 Why Lost Cultural Relics Matter in China -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Approaches to Chinese Cultural Relics -- 6.2.1 Symbolizing and Decoding Chinese History -- 6.2.2 Representing Chinese Culture -- 6.2.3 Instruments to Chinese Cultural Identity -- 6.2.3.1 Chinese Cultural Identity -- 6.3 Approaches to the Loss of Chinese Cultural Relics -- 6.3.1 Loss of Cultural Relics as National Tragedy -- 6.3.1.1 Chinese Nationalism -- 6.3.2 Repatriation of Lost Cultural Relics as Recognition of Identity? -- 6.4 Conclusion -- 7 Conclusions and Recommendations -- Bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/cover_art
https://contentcafe2.btol.com/ContentCafe/Jacket.aspx?Return=1&Type=S&Value=9789811005978&userID=ebsco-test&password=ebsco-test
Dimensions
unknown
http://library.link/vocab/discovery_link
{'f': 'http://opac.lib.rpi.edu/record=b4384932'}
Extent
1 online resource (202 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789811005978
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote

Library Locations

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