Coverart for item
The Resource Targeting

Targeting

Label
Targeting
Title
Targeting
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Targeting
Label
Targeting
Link
http://libproxy.rpi.edu/login?url=https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/rpi/detail.action?docID=4084582
Publication
Copyright
Related Contributor
Related Location
Related Agents
Related Authorities
Related Subjects
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Foreword -- Preface -- Contents -- Editors and Contributors -- 1 Introduction -- Abstract -- 1.1 Targeting -- 1.2 Purpose and Audience -- 1.3 Structure -- Part I Context -- 2 Targeting in Context -- Abstract -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Who -- 2.3 What -- 2.4 How -- References -- 3 From Douhet to Drones, Air Warfare, and the Evolution of Targeting -- Abstract -- 3.1 Introduction: Air Warfare and Targeting -- 3.2 Targeting Until 1945 -- 3.2.1 The Emergence of Targeting -- 3.2.1.1 From Frontline to Fire Support to Rear-Area Bombardment -- 3.2.2 The Interbellum -- 3.2.2.1 Strategic Bombing Theory -- 3.2.2.2 Metaphors and Assumptions -- 3.2.2.3 Norms: Security Concerns Before Morality -- 3.2.3 World War II (WW II) -- 3.2.3.1 Targeting Morale -- 3.2.3.2 Intelligence and Organization -- 3.2.3.3 Disagreements -- 3.2.3.4 Targeting Lessons Disregarded -- 3.2.3.5 Norms -- 3.3 Targeting During the Cold War -- 3.3.1 The Korean War -- 3.3.1.1 Targeting Organization -- 3.3.1.2 Targets -- 3.3.1.3 Inter-service Disagreements -- 3.3.1.4 Norms -- 3.3.2 The Vietnam War -- 3.3.2.1 Political Influence -- 3.3.2.2 Process and Organization -- 3.3.2.3 Inter-service Disagreements -- 3.3.2.4 Norms -- 3.4 The First Post-Cold War Decade -- 3.4.1 Operation Desert Storm -- 3.4.1.1 Technology for Targeting -- 3.4.1.2 Targeting Philosophy -- 3.4.1.3 The Targets -- 3.4.1.4 Command Arrangement -- 3.4.1.5 Disagreements -- 3.4.1.6 Intelligence Problems -- 3.4.1.7 A New Standard -- 3.4.2 NATO over the Balkans: Post-modern Warfare Emerges -- 3.4.2.1 Coercing While Peacekeeping -- 3.4.2.2 Deny Flight -- 3.4.2.3 Allied Force: Politics, No Strategy -- 3.4.2.4 Disagreement over Strategy and Targets -- 3.4.2.5 Targets -- 3.4.2.6 Command: Allied Force Problems in the Targeting Organization -- 3.4.2.7 Shortening the Sensor-to-Shooter Time -- 3.4.2.8 Norms -- 3.4.2.9 Media
  • 3.5 Into the Twenty-First Century -- 3.5.1 Operation Enduring Freedom: Targeting Non-State Actors -- 3.5.1.1 Improving Targeting Capabilities -- 3.5.1.2 The Operation -- 3.5.1.3 Joint SOF and Air Operations -- 3.5.1.4 Command Arrangement: Centralized Tasking -- 3.5.2 Operation Iraqi Freedom -- 3.5.2.1 Targeting Technology -- 3.5.2.2 Air-Land Integration -- 3.5.2.3 Time-Sensitive-Targeting -- 3.5.2.4 Planning -- 3.5.2.5 Results -- 3.5.3 Fighting Terrorists, Insurgents, and Public Opinion -- 3.5.3.1 Drones, SOF Teams, and Leadership Targeting -- 3.5.3.2 Media and Adaptive Opponents: Lawfare -- 3.5.3.3 The Israeli Experience -- 3.5.3.4 Coping with Asymmetric Media Operations -- 3.5.3.5 Norms and the Drone-Warfare Debate -- 3.6 The Story-Arc of Targeting -- References -- 4 The Current Targeting Process -- Abstract -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 The Targeting Process Defined -- 4.3 The Steps of the Targeting Process -- 4.3.1 Objectives and Guidance -- 4.3.2 Planning -- 4.3.3 Execution -- 4.3.4 Assessment -- 4.4 Dynamics Which Inform the Targeting Process -- 4.4.1 Tension Between the Art and Science of Targeting -- 4.4.2 Equal Demands to both Speed Up and Slow down the Targeting Cycle -- 4.4.3 High Demand for Precision -- 4.4.4 Avoidance or at Least Mitigation of Collateral Damage -- 4.4.5 Non-lethal Capabilities, Increasingly Relevant in Today's Targeting Operations -- 4.4.6 Cognitive Approach as the Bedrock Targeting Principle -- 4.5 Conclusion: The Future of the Targeting Process through the Lens of Robotics -- References -- Part II Constraints -- 5 Some Considerations Concerning the Role of the Ius ad Bellum in Targeting -- Abstract -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 The Potential Impact of Ad Bellum Considerations upon the Nature of the Target or upon Certain Categories of Targets: Who or What May Be Targeted?
  • 5.3 The Impact of Ad Bellum Considerations upon the Geographical Scope of Operations: Where May Targets Be Engaged? -- 5.4 The Impact of Ad Bellum Considerations upon the Temporal Scope of Permissible Targeting: When May Targets Be Lawfully Engaged? -- 5.5 Concluding Remarks -- References -- 6 The Law of Targeting -- Abstract -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Target -- 6.2.1 Persons -- 6.2.2 Objects -- 6.3 Weapons -- 6.4 Execution of the Attack -- 6.5 Collateral Damage and Incidental Injury -- 6.6 Location -- 6.7 Conclusion -- References -- 7 Ethical Issues in Targeting -- Abstract -- 7.1 The Perspective of Ethics -- 7.2 Fundamental Ethical Principles -- 7.3 Double Effect -- 7.4 Targeting in Deliberative Planning Versus Close Air Support -- 7.5 Targeting with RPV's (Drones) -- 7.6 Conclusion -- References -- 8 Rules of Engagement and Targeting -- Abstract -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Rules of Engagement Basics -- 8.2.1 Definition and Sources -- 8.2.2 Purpose and Development -- 8.3 Targeting and ROE -- 8.3.1 Special Targeting (Elements of) ROE -- 8.3.2 Targeting as Reflected in ROE Application -- 8.3.3 Non-lethal ROE and Targeting -- 8.4 Conclusion -- References -- Part III Special Issues in Targeting -- 9 Means and Methods of the Future: Autonomous Systems -- Abstract -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Levels of Autonomy -- 9.3 Drivers of Greater Levels of Autonomy in Weapon Systems -- 9.3.1 Advances in Autonomous Technology -- 9.3.2 Operational Benefits of Autonomy -- 9.4 A Law of Armed Conflict Analysis of Autonomous Weapon Systems -- 9.4.1 The Lawfulness of the Weapon Itself -- 9.4.2 Rules Governing the Use of Weapons -- 9.5 The Impact of Autonomous Weapons on Targeting Processes -- 9.5.1 Targeting Doubt -- 9.5.2 Subjectivity in Targeting -- 9.6 Conclusions -- References -- 10 Non-kinetic Capabilities: Complementing the Kinetic Prevalence to Targeting -- Abstract
  • 10.1 Noting the Kinetic Prevalence and Reinventing Non-kinetic Capabilities -- 10.2 About Goals, Means, Targets, and Effects, as Well as Myths -- 10.3 Setting a Myth Aside: Combining Lethal and Non-lethal Action -- 10.4 A Discourse on 'Defining' Non-kinetic Targeting -- 10.5 Points of Departure and Reservations -- 10.6 Some Typical Non-kinetic Capabilities: Modalities -- 10.7 Information Activities -- 10.8 Key Leader Engagement -- 10.9 Lawfare -- 10.10 Criminal Legal Action -- 10.11 Deprivation of Liberty: Security Detention -- 10.12 Asset Freezes -- 10.13 Cyber Operations -- 10.14 Conclusions -- References -- 11 Targeting in Coalition Operations -- Abstract -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 The Legal Framework -- 11.2.1 International Law -- 11.2.2 LOAC Versus IHRL -- 11.2.3 Domestic Law (TCN and Host Nation) -- 11.2.4 The Mandate -- 11.2.5 Standing Operating Procedures -- 11.2.6 Rules of Engagement -- 11.3 Targeting and Interoperability -- 11.3.1 Intelligence -- 11.3.2 Principle of Distinction -- 11.3.2.1 Military Objectives -- 11.3.2.2 Individuals and Direct Participation in Hostilities (DPH) -- 11.3.3 Collateral Damage -- 11.3.4 Weapons -- 11.3.4.1 Precision Guided Munitions (PGM) -- 11.3.4.2 Anti-personnel Mines -- 11.3.4.3 Cluster Munitions -- 11.4 Responsibility -- 11.4.1 Command and Control Arrangements -- 11.4.2 State Versus International Organization Responsibility -- 11.4.3 Command Responsibility -- 11.5 Conclusion -- References -- 12 Evaluating the Effectiveness of Leadership Decapitation Tactics Against Terrorist Groups -- Abstract -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 Leadership Decapitation, Succession, and Organizational Characteristics of Terrorist Groups -- 12.2.1 Leadership and Leadership Succession in Violent Organizations -- 12.2.2 Leadership and Leadership Succession in Clandestine Organizations
  • 12.2.3 Leadership and Leadership Succession in Values-Based Organizations -- 12.3 A New Way of Evaluating the Effectiveness of Leadership Decapitation -- 12.3.1 Criteria -- 12.3.2 The Variables -- 12.3.3 The Model -- 12.4 Results -- 12.5 Implications for al-Qaeda and Concluding Thoughts -- References -- Annex: Table of Operations -- Index
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Dimensions
unknown
http://library.link/vocab/discovery_link
{'f': 'http://opac.lib.rpi.edu/record=b4384078'}
Extent
1 online resource (303 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789462650725
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote

Subject

Library Locations

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