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The Resource Regenerative Medicine - from Protocol to Patient : 3. Tissue Engineering, Biomaterials and Nanotechnology

Regenerative Medicine - from Protocol to Patient : 3. Tissue Engineering, Biomaterials and Nanotechnology

Label
Regenerative Medicine - from Protocol to Patient : 3. Tissue Engineering, Biomaterials and Nanotechnology
Title
Regenerative Medicine - from Protocol to Patient
Title remainder
3. Tissue Engineering, Biomaterials and Nanotechnology
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Subject
Language
eng
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Regenerative Medicine - from Protocol to Patient : 3. Tissue Engineering, Biomaterials and Nanotechnology
Label
Regenerative Medicine - from Protocol to Patient : 3. Tissue Engineering, Biomaterials and Nanotechnology
Link
http://libproxy.rpi.edu/login?url=https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/rpi/detail.action?docID=4504823
Publication
Copyright
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Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Foreword -- Third Edition -- Literature -- Contents -- Contributors -- Chapter 1: Novel Concepts in Design and Fabrication of 'Living' Bioprosthetic Heart Valves: From Cell Mechanosensing to Advanced Tissue Engineering Applications -- 1.1 Introduction - The Current Limitations in Biological/Bio-Prosthetic Valve Implants Design -- 1.2 Designing the Right Mechanosensing Environment - Anisotropic Structure and Valve Resistance to Mechanical Load -- 1.3 Mechanical Load, Mechanosensing and Cellular Responses -- 1.4 From Cell and Tissue Mechanics to Tissue Engineering -- 1.5 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 2: Recent Progress in Strategies for Adenovirus Mediated Therapeutic Cell Targeting -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.1.1 The Concept of Gene Therapy -- 2.1.2 The Tools for Gene Therapy -- 2.2 Screening Methods for Cell-Specific Ligands -- 2.3 Methods to Specifically Target Adenovirus-Derived Vectors -- 2.3.1 Genetic Fiber Engineering -- 2.3.2 Alteration of Vector Tropism by PEGylation -- 2.3.3 Bifunctional Non-Covalently Linked Adaptor Molecules -- 2.4 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 3: Regenerative Chimerism Bioengineered Through Stem Cell Reprogramming -- 3.1 Introduction: Regenerative Medicine -- 3.1.1 Rejuvenation -- 3.1.2 Replacement -- 3.1.3 Regeneration -- 3.2 Natural Chimerism: Heart Rejuvenation -- 3.3 Surgical Chimerism: Heart Replacement -- 3.4 Bioengineered Chimerism: Heart Regeneration -- 3.4.1 Recapitulating De Novo Cardiogenesis -- 3.4.2 Advancing Stem Cell-Based Cardiac Repair -- 3.5 Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: A Platform for Unlimited Cardiac Repair -- 3.5.1 Principles of Nuclear Reprogramming -- 3.5.2 Autologous Pluripotent Stem Cells -- 3.5.2.1 First-Generation Technology -- 3.5.2.2 Second-Generation Technology -- 3.5.3 Regeneration of Diseased Tissues -- 3.6 Clinical Perspective -- References
  • Chapter 4: Biodegradable Polymeric Materials -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Polymer-Based Biomaterials -- 4.2.1 Polyesters -- 4.2.2 Poly(Ester Amide)s -- 4.2.3 Poly(ortho ester)s -- 4.2.4 Polyurethanes -- 4.2.5 Polyanhydrides -- 4.2.6 Polycyanoacrylates -- 4.2.7 Polyphosphazenes -- 4.2.8 Hydrogels -- 4.3 Biomaterials Based on Natural Products -- 4.3.1 Other Natural Materials -- 4.3.2 Examples for Approved Natural Materials -- 4.4 Conclusion and Outlook -- References -- Chapter 5: Biomaterials-Enabled Regenerative Medicine in Corneal Applications -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.1.1 The Cornea -- 5.1.2 The Need for Alternatives to Donated Corneas for Transplantation -- 5.2 Natural Acellular and Decellularised Scaffolds -- 5.2.1 Human Amniotic Membrane -- 5.2.2 Decellularised Corneas -- 5.3 Self-Assembled Corneas -- 5.4 Keratoprostheses Enhanced for Biointeraction and Regeneration -- 5.4.1 Extracellular Matrix Proteins and Cell Adhesion Peptides -- 5.4.2 Growth Factors -- 5.4.3 Biomaterials with Anti-Microbial Properties -- 5.5 Temperature Responsive Substrates for Corneal Cell Sheets -- 5.6 Biomimetic Implants Derived from Extracellular Matrix Components or Analogues -- 5.6.1 Fibrin -- 5.6.2 Collagen -- 5.6.2.1 Vitrigel Membrane -- 5.6.2.2 Collagen Fibers -- 5.6.2.3 Compressed Collagen -- 5.6.2.4 Synthetic Collagen Based Scaffolds -- 5.6.2.5 Collagen Analogues as Corneal Substitute in Clinical Studies -- 5.7 Other Biomaterials and Recent Developments -- 5.7.1 Silk Fibroin -- 5.7.2 Plasma-Treated Contact Lenses -- 5.7.3 Self-Assembling Peptides -- 5.7.4 Molecular Crowding -- 5.8 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 6: Functionalized Nanomaterials -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Principles -- 6.2.1 Nanoparticles for Cell Tracking -- 6.2.2 Scaffold for Tissue Regeneracy -- 6.3 Technological and Biological Opportunities for Therapeutic Devices
  • 6.3.1 Functionalized Nanoparticles for Cell Tracking -- 6.3.1.1 Magnetic Nanoparticles -- 6.3.1.2 Quantum Dots -- 6.3.1.3 Other Nanoparticles -- 6.3.2 Functionalized Nanomaterials for Tissue Regeneracy -- 6.3.2.1 Self-Assembly -- 6.3.2.2 Phase Separation -- 6.3.2.3 Electrospinning -- 6.3.2.4 Nanocomposite Scaffold -- 6.4 Applications for Therapeutic Devices -- 6.5 Barriers to Practice and Prospects -- 6.6 Conclusions and Future Challenges -- References -- Chapter 7: Biointerface Technology -- 7.1 Introduction: An Historical Perspective -- 7.2 Background/Principles -- 7.2.1 Mechanisms of Cell Adhesion -- 7.2.2 Cellular Mechanotransduction -- 7.2.3 Interaction with the Extracellular Matrix in the Stem Cell Niche -- 7.3 Technological and Biological Opportunities for Therapeutic Devices -- 7.3.1 Chemical Modification to Control the Biointerface -- 7.3.1.1 Modification of Chemical Groups -- 7.3.1.2 Grafting of Cell Adhesion Ligands -- 7.3.1.3 Grafting of Antimicrobial Peptides and Organic Compounds -- 7.3.1.4 Coating with Decellularized Extracellular Matrix -- 7.3.1.5 Immobilization of Growth Factors -- 7.3.1.6 Surface Loading and Release of Cations -- 7.3.2 Physical Modifications to Control the Biointerface -- 7.3.2.1 Structural Organization of the Surface -- 7.3.2.2 Mechanical Characteristics of the Surface -- 7.4 Applications for Therapeutic Devices -- 7.5 Barriers to Practice and Prospects -- 7.6 Conclusions and Future Challenges -- References -- Chapter 8: Controlled Release Technologies for RNAi Strategies in Regenerative Medicine -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Background and Principles -- 8.3 Formulation Strategies for siRNA and Nanoparticulate Systems -- 8.3.1 Naked siRNA -- 8.3.2 Chemically Conjugated siRNA -- 8.3.3 Viral Vectors -- 8.3.4 Liposomal Delivery -- 8.3.5 Polymeric, siRNA Loaded Nanoparticles -- 8.3.6 Cyclodextrins
  • 8.3.7 Natural Cationic Polymers -- 8.3.8 Micelles -- 8.3.9 Concepts Involving Biodegradable Polymers for Nanoparticle Formulation -- 8.3.10 Layer-by-Layer Techniques -- 8.3.11 Cell-Penetrating Peptides -- 8.4 Biomaterials as Scaffolds for Sustained Release of RNAi Therapeutics -- 8.5 Modification of Delivery Systems for Cellular Targeting -- 8.6 Application -- 8.6.1 Bone and Cartilage -- 8.6.1.1 Targeting RANK -- 8.6.1.2 Targeting BMP-2 Antagonists -- 8.6.1.3 Other Targets for Improved Bone and Cartilage Formation -- 8.6.1.4 Cartilage -- 8.6.1.5 miRNA for Bone Applications -- 8.6.2 Other Tissues -- 8.7 Barriers to Practice{u2026} -- 8.8 {u2026}and How to Overcome them -- 8.8.1 Approaches to Stabilize siRNA by Chemical Modifications -- 8.8.2 Opportunities of Local Delivery -- References -- Chapter 9: Imaging Technology -- 9.1 Introduction: A Historical Perspective -- 9.2 Background/Principles -- 9.2.1 Safety -- 9.2.1.1 Cell-Tracking: Biodistribution/Fate -- Direct Labelling -- Indirect Cell Labeling -- 9.2.1.2 Teratoma and Tumor Formation -- 9.2.2 Mode of Action -- 9.2.2.1 Apoptosis -- 9.2.2.2 Angiogenesis -- 9.2.2.3 Inflammation -- 9.3 Technological and Biological Opportunities for Therapeutic Devices -- 9.3.1 Fate of Transplanted Cells: Engraftment and Biodistribution -- 9.3.1.1 Phase I: Acute Mechnical Cell Loss -- 9.3.1.2 Phase II: Chronic Cell Loss -- 9.3.1.3 Phase III: Long-Term Engraftment -- 9.3.2 Mechanisms Underlying Myocardial Repair (Mode of Action) -- 9.4 Applications for Therapeutic Devices -- 9.4.1 Cell Fate Tracking in Clinical Studies -- 9.4.2 In Vivo Monitoring of Therapeutic Effects Underlying Regenerative Therapies to Damaged Heart -- 9.4.2.1 Angiogenesis -- 9.4.2.2 Apoptosis -- 9.4.2.3 Inflammation -- 9.5 Barriers to Practice and Prospects -- 9.6 Conclusions and Future Challenges -- References -- Index
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{'f': 'http://opac.lib.rpi.edu/record=b4385126'}
Edition
3rd ed.
Extent
1 online resource (257 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783319282749
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
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unknown sound
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remote

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