Coverart for item
The Resource Observing Policy-Making in Indonesia

Observing Policy-Making in Indonesia

Label
Observing Policy-Making in Indonesia
Title
Observing Policy-Making in Indonesia
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Observing Policy-Making in Indonesia
Label
Observing Policy-Making in Indonesia
Link
http://libproxy.rpi.edu/login?url=https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/rpi/detail.action?docID=4709263
Publication
Copyright
Related Contributor
Related Location
Related Agents
Related Authorities
Related Subjects
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Notes -- Currency Conversion -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- Thesis Advisors -- English Instructors -- Contents -- Introduction -- 1 Making Policy Education Relevant to Policy-Making -- 1.1 The Changing Mission of Policy Schools -- 1.2 Policy-Making Is not Just the Design of Sound Policies -- 1.3 The Real Meaning of Teaching Policy Implementation -- 1.4 Bringing the Classroom to the Policy Fields -- 1.5 A Few Final Remarks About the Content of This Book -- 2 Highlights and Reflections on Policy-Making in Indonesia -- Case-Studies -- 3 Tourism Development in West Nusa Tenggara -- 3.1 Executive Summary -- 3.2 Introduction and Research Design -- 3.2.1 Introduction -- 3.2.2 Research Question -- 3.2.3 Research Design -- 3.2.3.1 Qualitative Approach -- 3.2.3.2 Quantitative Approach -- 3.3 Background and Context -- 3.3.1 Government Involvement in Tourism Development -- 3.3.2 The Mandalika Project in Central Lombok -- 3.3.2.1 Location -- 3.3.2.2 Land Ownership System -- 3.3.2.3 People -- 3.3.2.4 Governance Structure -- 3.3.2.5 Developers -- 3.3.2.6 Original Development Proposal -- 3.3.2.7 BTDC Replaces LTDC -- 3.3.2.8 Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) -- 3.3.3 Conclusion -- 3.4 Results and Analysis -- 3.4.1 Introduction -- 3.4.2 Institutional Actors -- 3.4.2.1 Government -- 3.4.2.2 State-Owned Enterprise -- 3.4.2.3 Investors -- 3.4.2.4 Sasak Community -- 3.4.2.5 Villagers -- 3.4.2.6 Relationships Between Actors -- 3.4.3 Information Flow -- 3.4.3.1 Villagers' Perspective -- 3.4.3.2 BTDC's Perspective -- 3.4.3.3 Government's Perspective -- 3.4.4 Property Rights -- 3.4.4.1 Villagers' Perspective -- 3.4.4.2 BTDC's Perspective -- 3.4.4.3 Government's Perspective -- 3.4.4.4 Others -- 3.4.5 Coordination -- 3.4.5.1 BTDC's Perspective -- 3.4.5.2 Government's Perspective -- 3.4.6 Translation of the Nusa Dua Model to Mandalika -- 3.4.6.1 BTDC's Perspective
  • 3.4.6.2 Villagers' Perspective -- 3.4.7 Creating a Place of Exclusiveness -- 3.4.7.1 Villagers' Perspective -- 3.4.7.2 BTDC's Perspective -- 3.4.8 Summary -- 3.5 Conclusion and Implications -- 3.5.1 Summary -- 3.5.2 Broader Implications of the Research -- 3.5.3 Concluding Remarks -- References -- 4 Open Recruitment for District and Ward Heads in Jakarta Administration -- 4.1 Executive Summary -- 4.2 Introduction -- 4.2.1 Background -- 4.2.1.1 Jakarta and Open Recruitment Policy -- 4.2.1.2 Support and Opposition -- 4.2.2 Research Question -- 4.2.3 Research Methodology -- 4.2.4 The Arguments -- 4.3 The Open Recruitment Implementation -- 4.3.1 General Setting -- 4.3.1.1 The Actors -- 4.3.1.1.1 Internal Actors -- 4.3.1.1.2 External Actors -- 4.3.1.1.3 Relationship Between Actors -- 4.3.1.2 District and Ward Head Recruitment -- 4.3.1.3 Preparation -- 4.3.1.3.1 Team formation -- 4.3.1.3.2 Technical preparation -- 4.3.1.3.3 Test material preparation -- 4.3.2 The Mechanism -- 4.3.2.1 Pre-test -- 4.3.2.1.1 Announcement (April 1 2013) -- 4.3.2.1.2 Dissemination of information (4-5 April 2013) -- 4.3.2.1.3 Registration (8-22 April 2013) -- 4.3.2.2 Test -- 4.3.2.2.1 Field Competencies Test (27-28 April 2013) -- 4.3.2.2.2 Managerial test (7 May to 10 June 2013) -- 4.3.2.3 Post-test -- 4.3.2.3.1 Medical Checkup (24-25 June 2013) -- 4.3.2.3.2 Public Hearing (25 June 2013) -- 4.3.3 Final Result -- 4.3.3.1 Procedure -- 4.3.3.2 Replacement (25-26 June 2013) -- 4.4 Conclusion -- 4.4.1 Analysis -- 4.4.2 Potential Long-Term Effects of Policy Implementation -- 4.4.3 Policy Lessons Learnt -- References -- 5 Resettlement of Former East Timorese Refugees in East Nusa Tenggara -- 5.1 Executive Summary -- 5.2 Introduction -- 5.2.1 Background Information -- 5.2.2 Research Question -- 5.2.3 Research Significance -- 5.2.4 Field Research -- 5.2.5 Research Limitations
  • 5.2.6 Outline of Paper -- 5.3 Tracing Refugees from Camps to Resettlements -- 5.3.1 Patterns of Movement and Distribution -- 5.3.2 Overview of Refugee Camps and Resettlements -- 5.3.2.1 Kupang Regency -- 5.3.2.2 Kupang City -- 5.3.2.3 Belu Regency -- 5.3.2.4 Malaka Regency -- 5.3.3 General Resettlement Process -- 5.3.3.1 Land Acquisition Process -- 5.3.3.1.1 Government-Owned Land Granted by the Government -- 5.3.3.1.2 Acquisition by the Government, of Land Owned by Locals -- 5.3.3.1.3 Acquisition by the Former Refugees of Land Owned by Locals -- 5.3.3.2 House Construction Process -- 5.3.3.2.1 Cash -- 5.3.3.2.2 Construction Materials (or Bahan Bangunan Rumah or BBR) -- 5.3.3.2.3 Completed House -- 5.3.3.3 Process Analysis -- 5.4 Analysis of Resettlement Process -- 5.4.1 Challenges Faced by Former Refugees -- 5.4.1.1 Factors Related to the Continued Existence of Refugee Camps -- 5.4.1.1.1 Former Refugees Have no Money to Buy Land -- 5.4.1.1.2 Refugee Camps Offer Better Livelihood -- 5.4.1.1.3 Lack of Basic Services in Resettlements -- 5.4.1.1.4 Preference to Stay as a Group in the Camps -- 5.4.1.1.5 High Expectation on Government Assistance -- 5.4.1.2 Factors Related to the Acceptance of Resettlement -- 5.4.1.2.1 Dire Conditions at Refugee Camps -- 5.4.1.2.2 Resettlements Provide Housing Security -- 5.4.1.2.3 Preference to Relocate as a Group to Resettlement -- 5.4.1.2.4 Desire to Receive Government Assistance Related to Resettlement -- 5.4.1.2.5 Incentives for Locals to Receive Former Refugees in Their Villages -- 5.4.1.2.6 No State Land for Refugee Camps -- 5.4.2 Challenges Faced by the Government -- 5.4.2.1 Internal Challenges -- 5.4.2.1.1 Lack of Database on Former Refugees -- 5.4.2.1.2 Lack of Solid Resettlement Plan -- 5.4.2.1.3 Lack of Monitoring -- 5.4.2.2 External Challenges -- 5.4.2.2.1 Umaklaran Village, Belu Regency
  • 5.4.3 Land Status of Resettlements -- 5.5 Factors Favoring the Assimilation of Former Refugees into Local Communities -- 5.5.1 Relations Between Former Refugees and Locals -- 5.5.1.1 Kupang Versus Belu, West Versus East -- 5.5.1.2 Cultural and Family Ties in Kupang -- 5.5.1.3 Cultural and Family Ties in Belu -- 5.5.2 Local Politics -- 5.5.2.1 Former Refugees as Threat to Local Politics -- 5.5.2.2 Village Politics as Catalyst for Resettlements -- 5.5.2.3 Former Refugees Refraining from Local Politics -- 5.5.2.4 Local Politics in Kupang and Belu -- 5.6 Conclusion -- 5.6.1 Addressing the Research Objectives -- 5.6.1.1 Resettlement Process of Former Refugees in West Timor -- 5.6.1.2 Limiting and Supporting Factors of Resettlements -- 5.6.1.3 Differences of Resettlement in Kupang Area and Belu Area -- 5.6.1.4 Assimilation of Former Refugees into Local Communities -- 5.6.1.5 Conclusion -- 5.6.2 Further Research -- References -- 6 National Program for Community Empowerment in Rural Areas in Bekasi -- 6.1 Executive Summary -- 6.2 Introduction -- 6.2.1 Background Information -- 6.2.2 Research Significance -- 6.2.3 Field Research -- 6.2.3.1 Babelan District -- 6.2.3.2 Karang Bahagia District -- 6.2.4 Research Question -- 6.3 Understanding PNPM-Rural -- 6.3.1 Key Actors -- 6.3.2 Program Selection -- 6.3.3 Budget -- 6.3.4 Sanctions -- 6.3.5 Programs -- 6.3.5.1 Microcredit for Women Program -- 6.3.5.1.1 Process -- 6.3.5.1.2 Repayment Rate -- 6.3.5.2 Infrastructure Program -- 6.3.6 Tools of Community Empowerment -- 6.3.6.1 Village and Intervillage Deliberation Meetings -- 6.3.6.2 Capacity Building for the Local People -- 6.3.6.3 Monitoring and Maintaining Functions -- 6.4 Implementation of PNPM-Rural -- 6.4.1 Overview of PNPM-Rural Programs -- 6.4.2 Babelan District -- 6.4.3 Karang Bahagia District -- 6.5 Problem Analysis
  • 6.5.1 Misappropriation of Collected Payment -- 6.5.2 Inappropriate Microcredit Group -- 6.5.3 Misuse of Microcredit Loans -- 6.5.4 Lack of Monitoring -- 6.5.5 Problem of Bureaucracy -- 6.5.6 PNPM-Rural as a Way to Capture Resources -- 6.6 Conclusion -- References -- 7 Waste-for-Health Insurance -- 7.1 Executive Summary -- 7.2 Introduction -- 7.3 Methodology -- 7.4 The History: Implementing the Waste-for-Health Insurance Initiative -- 7.4.1 History of the Waste-for-Health Insurance Initiative -- 7.4.2 History of the Organization -- 7.4.3 Pre-existing Conditions of the Host Location -- 7.4.4 Categorization of the Host Community -- 7.5 The Execution: Contributing Factors of Success -- 7.5.1 Support of the Management of the Clinic -- 7.5.2 Community Participation and Volunteers -- 7.5.3 Getting the Right Sponsor and Moderate Publicity -- 7.6 Finding the Right Partner -- 7.6.1 Waste Bank -- 7.6.2 City Government -- 7.7 The Tragedy of Success: What Went Wrong? -- 7.7.1 Internal Factors -- 7.7.1.1 System Failure -- 7.7.1.2 Professionalization of the Organization -- 7.7.1.3 Derailment from the Organizational Objectives -- 7.7.2 External Factors -- 7.7.2.1 Awards, Prizes, and Recognitions -- 7.7.2.2 Media -- 7.7.2.3 Termination of Commitment by the Waste Bank -- 7.8 Conclusion -- 8 Solid Waste Management in Jakarta and Surabaya -- 8.1 Executive Summary -- 8.2 Introduction -- 8.2.1 Background -- 8.2.2 Purpose of Research -- 8.2.3 Research Question -- 8.2.4 Scope and Limitation -- 8.2.5 Methodology -- 8.3 SWM in Jakarta -- 8.3.1 The Process Flow of Household Solid Waste -- 8.3.1.1 Waste Disposal and Storage -- 8.3.1.2 Collection -- 8.3.1.3 Transfer Station -- 8.3.1.4 Transportation -- 8.3.1.5 End Site -- 8.3.1.6 Waste Picker -- 8.3.2 Actors and Policy -- 8.3.2.1 Jakarta Sanitation Department and the Frontline Workers -- 8.3.2.2 Public Participation
  • 8.3.2.3 The Policy
http://library.link/vocab/cover_art
https://contentcafe2.btol.com/ContentCafe/Jacket.aspx?Return=1&Type=S&Value=9789811022425&userID=ebsco-test&password=ebsco-test
Dimensions
unknown
http://library.link/vocab/discovery_link
{'f': 'http://opac.lib.rpi.edu/record=b4392821'}
Extent
1 online resource (236 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789811022425
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote

Library Locations

    • Folsom LibraryBorrow it
      110 8th St, Troy, NY, 12180, US
      42.729766 -73.682577
Processing Feedback ...