Coverart for item
The Resource Mission Mastery : Revealing a 100 Year Old Leadership Secret

Mission Mastery : Revealing a 100 Year Old Leadership Secret

Label
Mission Mastery : Revealing a 100 Year Old Leadership Secret
Title
Mission Mastery
Title remainder
Revealing a 100 Year Old Leadership Secret
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Series statement
Management for Professionals Ser
Mission Mastery : Revealing a 100 Year Old Leadership Secret
Label
Mission Mastery : Revealing a 100 Year Old Leadership Secret
Link
http://libproxy.rpi.edu/login?url=https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/rpi/detail.action?docID=4354997
Publication
Copyright
Related Contributor
Related Location
Related Agents
Related Authorities
Related Subjects
Related Items
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Contents -- 1: Introduction: The Secret -- 1.1 General -- 1.2 Tapping into the Secret -- 1.2.1 So, What Is This Book About? -- 1.3 The Inspiration for This Book: A Study of the First Large Learning Organization -- 1.3.1 An Emerging Idea -- 1.3.2 Outstanding Leadership Is Difficult to Replicate -- 1.3.3 Outstanding Leadership Is Not Mono-dimensional -- 1.3.4 Why Has This Insight into Outstanding Leadership Been Ignored? -- 1.3.5 The Focus Is on Transformation -- 1.4 The Five Pillars of Mission Command -- 1.5 The Theme of the Book -- 1.5.1 What This Book Is Not About -- 1.5.2 The Book Outline -- 1.6 A Word About Decision Making Accountability (DMA) -- 1.6.1 The DMA Solution Set (DMASS) -- 1.6.2 Layers and Levels -- 1.6.3 Empowerment: A Blend of Moltke and DMA -- 1.7 The Experience Underpinning This Book -- 1.7.1 Held to Account -- 2: What Is Mission Mastery? -- 2.1 General -- 2.2 What Is Mission Command? -- 2.2.1 1806: The Seeds of Failure Are Often Sown at the Height of Greatness -- 2.2.2 The Immediate Aftermath -- 2.2.3 Three Critical Steps Then Followed -- 2.3 Learning in the Military -- 2.3.1 The Line and Staff Distinction -- 2.4 Learning in Civilian Organizations -- 2.4.1 A Global Finance Project -- 2.4.2 A Pan European Marking Project -- 2.4.3 The Lessons and Price of Project Failure? -- 2.5 Clausewitźs Contribution -- 2.5.1 F̀̀riktioń ́-- 2.6 Moltkés Contribution -- 2.6.1 À̀uftragstaktikeŕ ́-- 2.6.1.1 The Invisible Thread: Back-Briefing -- 2.6.1.2 Potential Sources of Friction -- 2.7 So, What Is Mission Command? -- 2.7.1 The Contrasting Approach of the C̀̀ompetitioń ́-- 2.7.2 The Royal Navýs Approach to Mission Command -- 2.7.2.1 The Royal Navy Sets Out Eight Principles of Mission Command -- Unity of Effort -- Decentralisation -- Trust -- Delegation Not Abdication -- Mutual Understanding -- Timely and Effective Decision Making
  • Responsibility for Decision-Making -- Communications -- 2.8 The Link Between the RŃs Mission Command and Mission Mastery -- 2.9 How Does the RŃs Version of Mission Command Mesh with Mission Mastery? -- 2.9.1 T̀̀he Park Touch ́́-- 2.10 Civilian Organizational Transformation Is Rare -- 3: Mission Mastery: Pillar 1-Mission -- 3.1 General -- 3.2 The Core of Mission Mastery -- 3.3 Moltkés Four Great Insights -- 3.3.1 The First Great Insight: There Is No Such Thing as a Perfect Plan -- 3.3.1.1 Moltke on Mission and Strategy -- 3.3.2 Moltkés Second Great Insight: The Ẁhat́ and Ẁhý of Strategy Must Be Separated From the H̀oẃ and Mastered at Differe... -- 3.3.2.1 What Purpose? -- 3.3.2.2 Formulation of Purpose -- 3.3.3 The Third Great Insight: The Three Strategic Traps -- 3.3.3.1 Three Sources of F̀̀rictioń ́-- 3.3.3.2 The Knowledge Trap -- 3.3.3.3 The Alignment Trap -- 3.3.3.4 The Effects Trap -- 3.3.3.5 The Solution -- 3.3.4 The Fourth Great Insight: The Definition of Operations as the Link Between Strategy and Tactics -- 3.4 Strategy in Civilian Organizations -- 3.4.1 A Strategy Case Study: An Achievement Gap -- 3.4.2 The Lesson -- 3.4.3 A Distinctive F̀ootprint́: Research on How It Should Be Done -- 4: Mission Mastery: Pillar 2-Organization Design -- 4.1 General -- 4.2 The Fulcrum Pillar -- 4.2.1 The Hidden Cornerstone -- 4.2.2 Accountability and Subsidiarity -- 4.3 Sources of Organization Design Friction -- 4.3.1 The Issue of Size -- 4.3.2 Job Evaluation -- 4.3.3 Globalisation -- 4.3.4 Impact of the Global Financial Crisis (GFC) -- 4.3.5 The Asset Trap -- 4.3.6 Changing Technology -- 4.3.7 Spurious OD Principles -- 4.3.8 The Contribution of Process Re-engineering -- 4.3.9 The Contribution of Fads and Fashions -- 4.3.10 Organization for Growth -- 4.3.11 Organization for Privatisation -- 4.3.12 Managing M and A Re-Organizations
  • 4.3.13 The Key Steps to Achieve Successful Change of Structure -- 4.4 History of Military Organization Design -- 4.4.1 The Key Element of Military Structure -- 4.5 Organization Design in Civilian Organizations -- 4.5.1 The Danger of Top-Down Organization Design -- 4.5.2 Is Hierarchy Still Valid for Civilian Organizations in the Twenty-First Century? -- 4.5.2.1 Hierarchy Is the (Necessary) Response to Increasing Complexity -- 4.5.3 Strategy and Structure: Know Your B̀̀usinesś ́-- 4.6 Structures for Growth -- 4.6.1 The Distinctive Footprint -- 4.7 The Civilian Approach to Hierarchy: How Tall Is too Tall? -- 4.7.1 The Key to Unlocking Hierarchy -- 4.7.2 Organize from the Customer (i.e. B̀̀ottom Uṕ)́ -- 4.7.3 Orchestrating the Horizontal Linkages -- 4.7.3.1 Horizontal Overload in a Large Local Authority -- 4.8 What Distorts the Structures of Civilian Organizations? -- 4.8.1 The Problem of Grade-Driven Structures in Civilian Organizations -- 4.8.2 The Identification of Clear Accountability Is the Key -- 4.8.3 The Probe Process -- 4.8.4 Ten Typical Shortcomings -- 5: Mission Mastery: Pillar 3-Leadership -- 5.1 General -- 5.2 Leadership Is More than the Person at the Top -- 5.2.1 Leadership Development Models Have Changed, Haveńt They? -- 5.2.2 Followership -- 5.2.3 Two Lens of Leadership -- 5.2.4 Two Dimensions of Personality -- 5.2.5 Two Approaches to Leadership Development -- 5.3 The Military Perspective -- 5.3.1 Summary of Military Leadership Qualities -- 5.4 Military Leadership Development -- 5.4.1 Officer Selection and Career Development -- 5.5 The Civilian Perspective -- 5.5.1 The False Leadership Dichotomy -- 5.5.2 Three Things Are Now Clear -- 5.6 Civilian Theories of Leadership -- 5.6.1 Charismatic Leadership -- 5.6.2 The Importance of the Situation, Contingency Theory and the Task -- 5.6.3 Style Must Be Relevant to the Substance Required
  • 5.6.4 Summary of Civilian Leadership Qualities -- 5.7 Civilian Leadership Development -- 5.7.1 The Fundamental Challenge -- 5.7.2 Accelerated Development: Does It Really Work? -- 5.7.3 The Distinctive Civilian Leadership Footprint -- 5.8 The Importance of Aligning Capability and Accountability -- 5.8.1 Bankrupt Ideas on Leadership and Hierarchy Are Alive and Well -- 5.8.2 Assessing Leadership Potential -- 5.8.3 The Vexed Issue of C̀ompetencieś -- 5.8.3.1 Values -- 5.8.3.2 Skills -- 5.8.4 DMA Leadership Model of Differentiating Competencies -- 5.8.4.1 Filling the Promotion Pipeline -- 5.8.4.2 The Military Competencieś Hook -- 5.8.5 The P̀̀romotion Obsessioń ́in Civilian Organizations -- 5.8.6 The Importance of Tracking High-Potential Leaders -- 5.8.7 Best Practice in World Class Companies -- 5.8.7.1 The Findings -- 5.8.8 Civilian Leadership Development: The Recurring Nightmare -- 6: Pillar 4: Experiential Learning -- 6.1 General -- 6.2 Two Contrasting Approaches -- 6.3 The Military Approach -- 6.4 Civilian Initiatives -- 6.4.1 Rehearsal Training -- 6.4.1.1 High Reliability Industries -- 6.5 What Is the Purpose and Value of Experiential Training? -- 6.5.1 Implications for Leadership Development -- 6.5.2 Use of Simulation in Commercial Organizations -- 6.5.2.1 The Case of Factory Supervisors -- 6.5.2.2 The Case of the Bank Managers -- 6.5.3 GemaSim -- 6.6 Experiential Learning: Crossing the Strategic Divide -- 6.6.1 How Does Experiential Learning Prepare One for Strategic Roles? -- 6.6.2 The Critical Role of Boundary Moves -- 6.6.2.1 The Military Approach -- 6.7 Strategic Experiential Learning in the Private Sector -- 6.7.1 The Approach -- 6.7.2 The Thirteen Key Findings -- 6.7.3 The Recommendations -- 6.7.4 Reality Check -- 7: Pillar 5: Culture -- 7.1 General -- 7.2 What Is Culture? -- 7.3 The Military Approach -- 7.4 The Civilian Approach
  • 7.4.1 Scheińs Contribution -- 7.4.2 Fligsteińs Contribution -- 7.4.3 One Companýs Contribution -- 7.5 Culture in Sport -- 7.5.1 The German Football Team -- 7.5.2 Australian Cricket Team -- 7.5.3 The New Zealand Rugby Team: The All Blacks -- 7.5.3.1 Ritual Symbolism -- 7.5.3.2 Excellence -- 7.5.3.3 Mindset -- 7.5.3.4 Study of the Ò̀ppositioń ́-- 7.5.3.5 Innovation: B̀̀rains Beats Talent at the Highest Leveĺ ́-- 7.5.3.6 Teamwork -- The Leader -- 7.5.4 In Summary -- 7.6 Civilian Organizations -- 7.6.1 Ritual and Symbolism -- 7.6.2 Excellence -- 7.6.3 Mindset -- 7.6.4 Analysis: Know the Competition -- 7.6.5 Innovation -- 7.6.6 Effective Teamwork -- 7.7 Cultural Implications for Management -- 7.8 What Causes a Negative Culture? -- 7.8.1 What Led to Barclaýs T̀̀oxic Culture? ́́-- 7.8.2 Assessment of Barclays Against the Five Pillars -- 7.8.2.1 Strategy -- 7.8.2.2 Organization Structure -- 7.8.2.3 Leadership Development and Training -- 7.8.2.4 Culture -- 7.8.2.5 Impact on HR -- 7.8.3 The Issue of Governance -- 7.8.3.1 The Military Approach to Governance -- 7.9 Culture Is Universal -- 7.9.1 A Culture Failure in Japan -- 7.9.2 The Influence of National Culture(s) -- 7.9.3 So, Is Accountability Only a Western Concept? -- 7.9.4 The Issue of Status -- 8: Mission Mastery: The DMA Solution Set -- 8.1 General -- 8.2 Decision Making Accountability -- 8.3 What Is the DMA Solution Set? -- 8.3.1 A Healthy Organization -- 8.3.2 Where Did DMASS Come From? -- 8.3.2.1 Consultant Contributions -- 8.3.2.2 Global Companies -- 8.3.2.3 Academic Contributions -- A Side Project -- 8.3.3 Layers and Levels -- 8.3.4 How Is DMASS Applied? -- 8.3.4.1 Personal Accountability -- 8.3.4.2 DMA Principles -- 8.3.4.3 The DMA Elements: Uncovering a Jobś Mission -- 8.3.4.4 Assessment of the Work Level -- WL Misconceptions -- 8.3.4.5 The Work Level Definitions
  • 8.4 Work Levels Applied to a Global HR Network, Levels 1-3
http://library.link/vocab/cover_art
https://contentcafe2.btol.com/ContentCafe/Jacket.aspx?Return=1&Type=S&Value=9783319252230&userID=ebsco-test&password=ebsco-test
Dimensions
unknown
http://library.link/vocab/discovery_link
{'f': 'http://opac.lib.rpi.edu/record=b4384784'}
Extent
1 online resource (338 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783319252230
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote

Library Locations

    • Folsom LibraryBorrow it
      110 8th St, Troy, NY, 12180, US
      42.729766 -73.682577
Processing Feedback ...