Coverart for item
The Resource Management by Permission : Managing People in the 21st Century

Management by Permission : Managing People in the 21st Century

Label
Management by Permission : Managing People in the 21st Century
Title
Management by Permission
Title remainder
Managing People in the 21st Century
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Series statement
Management for Professionals
Management by Permission : Managing People in the 21st Century
Label
Management by Permission : Managing People in the 21st Century
Link
http://libproxy.rpi.edu/login?url=https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/rpi/detail.action?docID=4443325
Publication
Copyright
Related Contributor
Related Location
Related Agents
Related Authorities
Related Subjects
Related Items
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Foreword -- Praise for Management by Permission -- Acknowledgements -- Contents -- List of Figures -- 1: Introduction -- 1.1 How Does This Book Relate to Other Books on Management and Leadership? -- 1.2 A Map of the Book -- 1.3 Who Is Our Audience? -- 1.4 Guide for Readers -- References -- 2: Management Is More Difficult, but It́s Not Mission Impossible -- 2.1 Managers Under Pressure -- 2.2 Difficult Times, More Challenging People -- 2.2.1 Reason One: Leaner and Meaner Organizations -- 2.2.2 Reason Two: Less Respect for Organizations, People in Authority and Those in Management Positions -- 2.2.3 Reason Three: A More Demanding, Self-assured and Diverse Workforce -- 2.2.4 Reason Four: Managers Often Less Well Equipped to Do the Job -- 2.3 The Bad News for Employees: You Pay a High Price for Being Poorly Managed -- 2.4 The Death of Autocratic Management? -- 2.5 The Good News: M̀̀anagement by Permissioń ́-- References -- 3: The First Ingredient: Keep Things Under Control -- THE THREE TECHNIQUES OF CONTROL ARE: -- 3.1 Technique Number One: Track the Numbers -- 3.1.1 First Danger: Misleading, Incomplete or Inappropriate Data -- 3.1.2 Second Danger: Unintended Consequences -- 3.1.3 Third Danger: Using Measures as a Stick Rather than as a Guide -- 3.1.4 Which Numbers Should I Track in My Area? -- 3.1.4.1 Consider What Is Already Available -- 3.1.4.2 Identify the Mandatory Numbers -- 3.1.4.3 Pinpoint What You Should Track at Your Particular Level -- 3.1.4.4 Consider How Often You Should Monitor the Numbers -- 3.1.4.5 Build in Early Warning Signs So You Have Time to Take Action -- 3.1.4.6 Track an Appropriate Number of Measures -- 3.1.4.7 Consider the Lessons of History and Benchmarking -- Remember -- 3.2 Technique Number Two: Use a Work Management System -- 3.2.1 Developing and Implementing Your Work Management System -- 3.2.1.1 Once a Job Is Complete
  • 3.2.1.2 A More Ambitious Work Management Scheme -- 3.2.2 Four Common Questions on Work Management Systems -- 3.2.2.1 Should Work Be Reviewed One-on-One, or as Part of a Meeting with the Entire Team? -- 3.2.2.2 When Not to Use the Team Review -- 3.2.2.3 How Do Managers Make Sure Work Management Meetings Are Efficient and Effective? -- 3.2.2.4 Should All Jobs Carried Out by My Team Be Included on the Work Management List? -- 3.2.2.5 How Does the Work Management System Link to Organizational Project Management Systems? -- 3.2.2.6 What About Micromanagement? Is It Ever Appropriate? Will People Feel I Dońt Trust Them? -- 3.2.2.7 Work Management Systems: Six Specific Benefits for Managers -- 3.2.2.8 Work Management Systems: Four Benefits for Those Being Managed -- Remember -- 3.3 Technique Number Three: Use Informal Methods and Management by Walking Around (Ẁ̀alk the Patch)́́ -- 3.3.1 Walking the Patch -- Remember -- 3.3.2 Ù̀nobtrusivé ́and Other Measures -- Remember -- References -- 4: The Second Ingredient: Establish Expectations -- 4.1 Never Forget You Are Dealing with Human Beings -- 4.1.1 Fact Number One: It Is Ẁ̀hole Personś ́Who Come to Work -- 4.1.2 Fact Number Two: All Human Beings Are Different -- 4.1.3 Fact Number Three: The Manager Too Is Part of the Equation -- Remember -- 4.2 Do the Basics First: Get to Know Your People (If You Dońt Already) -- 4.2.1 People: The Basic Facts -- 4.2.2 Going Beyond the Basic Facts About People -- 4.2.3 Other Sources of Information About People -- 4.2.4 In Conclusion: The Two Key Questions Any Manager Must Be Able to Answer -- 4.2.4.1 Willingness -- 4.2.4.2 Ability -- Remember -- 4.3 Establishing Expectations -- 4.3.1 If Yoúre Happy and You Know It -- 4.4 The Three Phases of Establishing Expectations: Before, During, and After -- 4.4.1 Before the Meeting: Prepare
  • 4.4.1.1 Their Current Performance: What They Need to Do: More of, Less of, Start Doing, Stop Doing -- 4.4.1.2 The Overall Organization Strategy -- 4.4.1.3 Current/Future Departmental Goals, Targets, Projects, or Initiatives -- 4.4.1.4 The Needs of Your Own Boss/Manager -- 4.4.1.5 Your Own Priorities -- 4.4.1.6 The Priorities of Staff -- 4.4.1.7 Develop an Initial Discussion List of Your Expectations for Each Team Member -- Remember -- 4.4.2 During the Meeting: Share and Discuss -- 4.4.2.1 State What Is Non-negotiable -- 4.4.2.2 Ensure Objectives People Can Control/Influence -- 4.4.2.3 Listen to Peoplés Expectations, Concerns and Issues -- Four Advantages of Listening with Understanding -- Tips for Dealing with Contentious Issues -- 4.4.2.4 Agree the Next Steps -- Remember -- 4.4.3 After the Meeting: Follow Through -- 4.4.3.1 Some Agreements Will Not Be Written Down -- Remember -- References -- 5: The Third Ingredient: Run Interference -- 5.1 Modern Organizations: A World of Distraction -- Remember -- 5.2 Running Interference: Get Your Organization Right First -- 5.2.1 Strategy/Vision/Mission/Tactics -- 5.2.2 Goals/Objectives/Targets -- 5.2.3 Structure -- 5.2.4 Roles -- 5.2.5 Customers/Stakeholders -- 5.2.6 Processes -- 5.2.7 Culture -- 5.2.8 People -- Remember -- 5.3 Identifying and Dealing with Manager Imposed Roadblocks -- 5.3.1 Poor Communications/Information Sharing -- 5.3.2 Wasting Peoplés Time/Poor Management Disciplines -- 5.3.3 Inappropriate Use of Teams or Task Forces -- 5.3.4 Actions Which Demotivate -- 5.3.5 People Issues -- 5.4 Identifying and Removing Any Barriers -- 5.4.1 The Role of Team Workshops -- Remember -- 5.5 Identifying and Dealing with Organization Imposed Roadblocks -- 5.5.1 P̀̀aying Your Tax ́́on Account -- 5.5.2 Dealing with Corporate Micromanagement When Projects Are Under Pressure
  • 5.5.3 Defence Against the Dark Arts: Dealing with Organizational Initiatives -- Remember -- 5.6 Protecting People from Self-inflicted Wounds -- 5.6.1 The Potential Dangers When Engaging with Senior Management -- 5.6.2 How Much Protection Should the Manager Provide? -- Remember -- References -- 6: The Fourth Ingredient: Develop the People -- Remember -- 6.1 Development in the Current Role -- 6.1.1 Analyzing Onés Own Development Needs -- 6.1.2 What Lies Behind the Various Questions? -- 6.1.3 Discussing Development Needs With the Manager -- Remember -- 6.1.4 Development on a (Practically) Zero Budget -- 6.1.5 Developing a Plan -- Remember -- 6.2 Development Towards Other Roles -- 6.2.1 Ỳ̀ou Cańt Always Get What You Want́́ (Helping People Develop a Realistic Career Plan) -- 6.2.2 Some Patterns of Career Development -- 6.2.3 Trying to Prevent the Resignations of Key People: The Ò̀rganizational Staké ́-- 6.2.3.1 If You Develop Them, They Will Stay -- 6.2.4 How do I Cope With Resignations When They Happen? -- Remember -- References -- 7: Conclusion: Coping When Yoúre Poorly Managed -- and Why Management Jobs Are Still Worth the Bother -- 7.1 What to Do if You Are Being Poorly Managed -- 7.1.1 Some Practical Steps You Can Take -- 7.1.1.1 Control -- 7.1.1.2 Clarifying Expectations -- 7.1.1.3 Running Interference -- 7.1.1.4 Development -- 7.1.2 If, Despite All Your Efforts -- 7.2 Management as a Maligned Profession: Are the Rewards Worth the Effort? -- 7.2.1 First Reason: Job Interest and Professional and Personal Development -- 7.2.2 Second Reason: Power, Influence and Status -- 7.2.3 Third Reason: Financial Rewards -- 7.2.4 Fourth Reason: Developing and Growing Others -- 7.3 Hello to Management by Permission, Goodbye to Shawshank -- Reference -- Appendix -- More Advanced Work Management System -- Index
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Dimensions
unknown
http://library.link/vocab/discovery_link
{'f': 'http://opac.lib.rpi.edu/record=b4384981'}
Extent
1 online resource (213 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783319252476
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote

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