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The Resource Language Structure and Environment : Social, cultural, and natural factors

Language Structure and Environment : Social, cultural, and natural factors

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Language Structure and Environment : Social, cultural, and natural factors
Title
Language Structure and Environment
Title remainder
Social, cultural, and natural factors
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
It is widely understood that the socio-historical contexts of languages have a direct bearing on their structures and on the types of stance that communities take in relation to them. Within the discipline of linguistics these socio-historical contexts and their impacts on communities' use and understanding of language are generally referred to as sociolinguistic factors. Meanwhile within descriptive linguistics the structure of language remains core. This is evidenced in the shape of university course design, structures of textbooks, and in how linguistic knowledge is recorded. In this paper we seek to map the relationship of the socio-historical context of linguistics to the languages that we study and in doing so, shift the focus so that the socio-historical context becomes central. Through this process the shape of the languages themselves is altered.We present a case study that compares linguistic and community perspectives on language boundaries in Milne Bay Provence, Papua New Guinea, and explore the processes through which the languages are created as objects and then become emblematic of culture and identity. We discuss the strong links that communities make between language, place and spirituality and consider the opportunities that these perspectives hold for language descriptions. Finally we consider how we, as linguists, can hold multiple perspectives on language and create culturally safe partnerships with communities that result in materials consistent with speakers' goals for their language
Member of
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Series statement
Cognitive Linguistic Studies in Cultural Contexts
Series volume
v.6
Language Structure and Environment : Social, cultural, and natural factors
Label
Language Structure and Environment : Social, cultural, and natural factors
Link
http://libproxy.rpi.edu/login?url=https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/rpi/detail.action?docID=2059942
Publication
Copyright
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Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Language Structure and Environment -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- The influence of social, cultural, and natural factors on language structure -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 Non-autonomous syntax -- 1.2 Linguistic relativity -- 2. Related fields -- 2.1 Functional grammar -- 2.2 Sociolinguistics -- 2.3 Ecolinguistics -- 2.4 Ethnosyntax -- 3. Relevant environmental parameters -- 3.1 Cultural factors -- 3.2 Social factors -- 3.3 Geographical factors -- 3.4 Natural factors -- 3.5 Human biology -- 3.6 Meta-perception of language -- Bibliography -- Part 1. Grammar and culture -- On the logical necessity of a cultural and cognitive connection for the origin of all aspects of linguistic structure -- 1. Cognition: Inference in understanding our surroundings -- 2. The nature of communication: Ostension and inference -- 3. The nature of language: Language is culture -- 4. How the grammars of languages differ -- Do they constrain or not constrain the interpretation of a particular semantic domain? -- If they constrain the interpretation of a particular domain, how much do they constrain it? -- If they constrain the interpretation of a particular domain, how do they constrain it? -- 5. Final remarks -- References -- The body, the universe, society and language -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Modern Germanic in the grip of the unknown -- 3. Changes in PG grammar as enactments of the Anabaptist worldview -- 3.1 The grammaticalization of zehle: From 'counting' to 'predicting' -- 3.2 The degrammaticalization of wotte from subjunctive modal to 'desire' -- 3.3 The rise of fer 'for' in purposive complement clauses -- 4. The speed of changes in PG grammar -- 5. Early Germanic in the grip of the unknown -- 6. Experiencing illness -- 6.1 The impersonal verb construction and its variants -- 6.2 The construction of inalienability and its variants
  • 6.3 Other oblique curiosities -- 6.4 The accusative subject in Middle Dutch -- 7. In sum -- 8. The decline of the dative-marked participant -- 9. A final note on the expression of sickness and disease in Modern English -- 10. In conclusion -- Bibliography -- Middle Dutch sources -- Old and Middle English sources -- When culture grammaticalizes -- 1. The Onya Darat language and its speakers -- 2. Encoding social information in pronouns: A Southeast Asian phenomenon -- 3. The pronominal system of Onya Darat -- 4. The origins of generational affiliation marking -- 5. Conclusion -- In Memoriam -- Bibliography -- The cultural bases of linguistic form -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 Culture and linguistic form -- 1.2 Linguistic and ethnographic background -- 2. Towards a sociocultural theory of linguistic form -- 3. Quotatives evidentials and reported speech constructions -- 3.1 Lexical quotative construction -- 3.2 Quotative evidentials -- 4. Reported speech in Nanti communicative practice -- 4.1 Talking about others' actions -- 4.2 Talking about others' internal states -- 4.3 Conflict, intimacy, and the evidential ethic -- 5. A practice-based account of the grammaticalization of Nanti quotatives and reportives -- 6. Discussion and conclusion -- Bibliography -- Part 2. Grammar and society -- Societies of intimates and linguistic complexity -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Cross-linguistically dispensable categories: Dual (plus) number -- 3. Cross-linguistically dispensable categories: Large pronominal systems -- 4. Cross-linguistically dispensable categories: Generationally-marked pronouns -- 5. Cross-linguistically dispensable categories: Evidentials -- 6. Conclusion -- Bibliography -- On the relation between linguistic and social factors in migrant language contact -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The Australian context -- 2.1 The functions of language
  • 3. Facilitation of code-switching through language contact -- 4. Pragmatic effects in the expression and performance of speech acts and social relations -- 4.1 Modal particles and discourse markers -- 4.2 Address -- 5. Standardisation and codification -- 6. Pluricentric languages -- 7. Diglossia -- 8. Language as a core value -- 9. Concluding remarks -- Bibliography -- Part 3. Grammar and geography -- Topography in language -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Frames of Reference -- 3. Static and dynamic relations -- 4. Frame of Reference typology -- 4.1 Intrinsic FoR -- 4.2 Relative FoR -- 4.3 Absolute FoR -- 4.4 Operationalizing each FoR -- 4.5 Diversity in absolute systems -- 5. Re-examining absolute FoR -- 5.1 Binary vs. ternary relations -- 5.2 Fixedness -- 5.3 Radial and curved axes -- 5.4 Unpredictable bearings -- 5.5 Abstractness and arbitrariness -- 5.6 The external world in absolute FoR -- 5.7 Ad hoc references -- 6. Landmarks -- 7. Three case studies -- 7.1 Balinese -- 7.2 Upsun and downsun -- 7.3 The ship as an external world -- 8. Logical properties of each FoR -- 8.1 Transitivity -- 8.2 Converseness -- 8.3 Constancy under rotation -- 8.4 Summary of logical properties -- 8.5 Logical properties of systems examined here -- 9. Topographic Correspondence Hypothesis -- 9.1 Predictions -- 9.2 Correlation between urban/rural environment and FoR choice -- 9.3 Correlation between hunter-gatherer lifestyle and FoR choice -- 9.4 The Environment Variable Method -- 9.5 Pilot findings -- 9.6 Testing the method: Absolute FoR in atoll-based languages -- 10. Conclusions -- Bibliography -- Walk around the clock -- 1. The Siar language -- 2. Siar demonstratives -- 2.1 Demonstrative determiners -- 2.2 Demonstrative pronouns -- 2.3 Demonstrative existentials -- 2.4 Locative adverbs -- 2.5 Allative adverbs -- 2.6 Semantics
  • 3. Clockwise and counterclockwise demonstratives -- 4. A historical account -- 4.1 Stage 0: Proto-Oceanic (1500 BC) -- 4.2 Siar on the east coast (before 1750) -- 4.3 Stage 2a: Settlement of Lambóm Island (1750-1900) -- 4.4 Stage 2b: Settlement on Lamassa Island (1750-1900) -- 4.5 Stage 3: Occupation of the southwest coast of New Ireland (1900-today) -- 5. An etymological account -- 6. Other (counter)clockwise systems -- 7. Conclusion -- Bibliography -- Types of spread zones -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Mountains: Vertical spreads -- 2.1 Central crest -- 2.2 Altiplano -- 3. Flatland spread zones -- 3.1 Open spread zones -- 3.2 Closed spread zones -- 4. Discussion and conclusions -- Bibliography -- Part 4. Grammar and evolution -- The role of adaptation in understanding linguistic diversity -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Why are there so many languages? -- 3. How different are languages, really? -- 3.1 Simulating the role of drift and selection pressures in linguistic diversity -- 4. The role of drift and selection in explaining linguistic diversity -- 5. The fit of languages to their environments: The importance of learning mechanisms -- 6. The child-adult learnability trade-off -- 7. Ecological constraints on language structures -- 8. Conclusion -- Bibliography -- Part 5. Grammar and the field of linguistics -- On becoming an object of study -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Viewing language through experiences and assumptions -- 3. Creating language boundaries -- 3.1 Linguistic creation of languages -- 3.2 Community creation of languages -- 3.3 Processes in the creation of languages -- 4. What might linguistics be missing? -- 4.1 Language and place -- 4.2 Language and spirituality -- 5. What could linguistics do with this information? -- 5.1 Multiple perspectives on language -- 5.2 Practising cultural safety -- 5.3 Other ways of creating language -- 6. Conclusion
  • Bibliography -- Subjects and Languages Index -- Author Index
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1 online resource (376 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789027268730
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
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remote

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