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The Resource Frontiers in Gynecological Endocrinology : Volume 3: Ovarian Function and Reproduction - from Needs to Possibilities

Frontiers in Gynecological Endocrinology : Volume 3: Ovarian Function and Reproduction - from Needs to Possibilities

Label
Frontiers in Gynecological Endocrinology : Volume 3: Ovarian Function and Reproduction - from Needs to Possibilities
Title
Frontiers in Gynecological Endocrinology
Title remainder
Volume 3: Ovarian Function and Reproduction - from Needs to Possibilities
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Subject
Language
eng
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MiAaPQ
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non fiction
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dictionaries
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ISGE Ser
Frontiers in Gynecological Endocrinology : Volume 3: Ovarian Function and Reproduction - from Needs to Possibilities
Label
Frontiers in Gynecological Endocrinology : Volume 3: Ovarian Function and Reproduction - from Needs to Possibilities
Link
http://libproxy.rpi.edu/login?url=https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/rpi/detail.action?docID=4182194
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Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Preface -- Contents -- Part I: From Ovulation to Assisted Reproduction: New Insight and Strategies -- 1: Luteal-Phase Stimulation -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Physiological Bases -- 1.3 Applications of Luteal-Phase Stimulation -- 1.3.1 Luteal-Phase Stimulation for Fertility Preservation -- 1.3.2 Luteal-Phase Stimulation in an Egg-Donation Programme -- 1.3.3 Luteal-Phase Stimulation in IVF Patients -- 1.3.4 Luteal-Phase Stimulation in the Low Responder -- 1.4 Discussion -- References -- 2: Management of Luteal Phase in IVF Cycles -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Physiopathology of the Luteal Phase in Stimulated Cycles -- 2.3 Luteal Phase Support After HCG Triggering -- 2.4 Luteal Phase Support After GnRH Agonist Triggering -- 2.5 GnRH Cotreatment in the Luteal Phase -- 2.6 Cessation of Luteal Support -- References -- 3: Genomics and Ovarian Response -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Follicular Development and Angiogenesis -- 3.3 FSH, LH, and Their Receptors -- 3.4 Oocyte Development and Quality -- 3.5 Follicular Development and Signaling Pathways -- 3.6 Progesterone and Its Receptors -- 3.7 Endometrial Development and Receptivity -- Conclusions -- References -- 4: Management of Poor Responders -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Ovarian Reserve Markers -- 4.2.1 Basal FSH -- 4.2.2 Anti-Müllerian Hormone -- 4.2.3 Antral Follicle Count (AFC) -- 4.2.4 History of Risk Factors for Low Reserve -- 4.3 Therapeutic Options in Low Responders -- 4.3.1 Ovarian Androgenisation -- 4.3.2 Growth Hormone -- 4.3.3 Oocyte Accumulation -- Conclusions -- References -- 5: Gene Expression in Cumulus Cells and Oocyte Quality -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Gene Modulation of Granulosa Cells During Folliculogenesis -- 5.3 Granulosa Cells Transcriptome Analysis -- 5.4 Granulosa Cells Transcriptome Analysis: The Ovarian Stimulation Effect
  • 5.5 Granulosa Cells Transcriptome Analysis: Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome -- Conclusions -- References -- Part II: AMH, Ovarian Ageing and Premature Ovarian Insufficency Fertility -- 6: Biomarkers of Ovarian Ageing -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Biomarkers -- 6.2.1 Antral Follicle Count (AFC) -- 6.2.2 Follicle-Stimulating Hormone (FSH) -- 6.2.3 Estradiol (E2) -- 6.2.4 Luteinizing Hormone (LH) -- 6.2.5 Inhibin-B -- 6.2.6 Anti-Müllerian Hormone (AMH) -- Conclusions -- References -- 7: Premature Ovarian Insufficiency: Advances in Management Through a Global Registry -- 7.1 Predictive Tests -- 7.2 Counselling and Emotional Support -- 7.3 Hormone Replacement Therapy -- 7.4 Fertility -- 7.5 POI Registry -- 7.5.1 Principles of POI Registry -- 7.5.2 Potential Benefits of POI Registry -- 7.5.3 POI Registry Progress in 2015 -- Conclusion -- References -- 8: The Long-Term Risks of Premature Ovarian Insufficiency -- References -- Part III: Gynecological Neuroendocrinology -- 9: Pharmacological and Integrative Treatment of Stress-Induced Hypothalamic Amenorrhea -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Neuroendocrine Mechanisms of Stress-Induced Hypogonadism -- 9.3 Neuroendocrine Mechanism of Hypothalamic Amenorrhea -- 9.4 Metabolic Signals as Stressors in Hypothalamic Amenorrhea -- 9.5 Clinical Considerations of Stress-Induced Reproductive Impairment -- 9.6 Putative Treatments for Hypothalamic Amenorrhea -- 9.6.1 CNS Peptides (Opioids, CRF) -- 9.6.2 Neurotransmitters, Neuromodulators (DA, GABA, Serotonin, etc.) -- 9.6.3 Various Hormones (PRL, Thyroid Hormones) -- 9.6.4 Low Dose Estrogenic Priming -- 9.6.5 Feeding and/or Energy Balance (Proteins, Glucose, Training) -- Conclusions -- References -- 10: Adipose Tissue and Menstrual Disturbances: Obesity Versus Anorexia Nervosa -- 10.1 Obesity and Menstrual Disturbances
  • 10.2 Anorexia Nervosa and Menstrual Disturbances -- Conclusion -- References -- 11: Neuroendocrine Basis of the Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Ovary Axis Aging -- References -- 12: Androgen Replacement in Women: Safe and Efficacious? -- Conclusion -- References -- Part IV: PCO, Metabolism, Vitamin D, Myoma and Endometriosis -- 13: The Ratio of MI to DCI and Its Impact in the Treatment of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Experimental and Literature Evidences -- 13.1 Introduction -- 13.2 Inositol(s) Story -- 13.3 MI:DCI Physiological Plasma Ratio -- 13.4 Conference Aim and Methods -- 13.5 MI and ART -- 13.5.1 Physiological Involvement of INS in Oocyte Maturation -- 13.5.1.1 Role of MI in Oogenesis and Early Embryogenesis -- 13.5.1.2 MI and Oogenesis: A Lesson from Polycystic Ovary Syndrome -- 13.5.2 INS Involvement in the Physiology of Spermatozoa Function -- 13.5.3 Usefulness of INS Treatment During ART Cycles -- 13.5.4 Comparison of the Clinical Efficacy Between Supplementation with MI and/or DCI -- Conclusions -- References -- 14: Metabolic Healthy Obesity and Metabolic Obesity with Normal Weight and CVD Risk in Women -- References -- 15: Myths of Endometriosis: "Endometriomas" -- 15.1 Background -- 15.2 Material and Methods -- 15.3 Results -- 15.4 Discussion -- Conclusions -- References -- 16: Vitamin D Deficiency: Diagnosis, Prevention, and Treatment - New Consensus -- 16.1 History of Vitamin D -- 16.2 Characteristics of Vitamin D -- 16.3 Transport of Vitamin D, 25(OH)D and 1,25 (OH)2D to the Tissues -- 16.4 Role of Vitamin D -- 16.5 Vitamin D Deficiency -- 16.6 Vitamin D Deficiency: Aging -- 16.7 Vitamin D Deficiency: Symptoms -- 16.8 Vitamin D Deficiency: Diagnosis -- 16.9 Treatment for Vitamin D Deficiency -- 16.10 Prevention of Vitamin D Insufficiency (Hypovitaminosis) -- 16.11 Polish Recommendation 2014
  • 16.12 Vitamin D Intoxication -- 16.13 Causes of Vitamin D Intoxication -- 16.14 Diagnosis of Vitamin D Intoxication -- 16.15 Treatment of Vitamin D Intoxication -- 16.16 Prevention of Vitamin D Intoxication -- References -- 17: Medical Treatment of Myomas -- 17.1 Introduction -- 17.2 Pathogenesis of Uterine Leiomyoma/Fibroid -- 17.3 Medical Treatment of Fibroids -- 17.3.1 Progestins -- 17.3.2 Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators (SERMs) -- 17.3.3 Aromatase Inhibitors -- 17.3.4 GnRH Analogue -- 17.3.5 Selective Progesterone Receptors Modulators (SPRMs) -- References -- Part V: Menopause and Ageing -- 18: Contraception in Climacterium -- 18.1 Definition -- 18.2 Etiology -- 18.3 Clinical and Hormonal Changes -- 18.4 Contraception -- 18.5 Contraception and Breasts -- 18.6 Ovarian, Endometrial, Cervical, and Colorectal Carcinoma -- 18.7 COCP, Ischemic Stroke, and Myocardial Infarction -- 18.8 Nonhormonal Contraception -- Conclusion -- References -- 19: Management of Symptoms During the Menopausal Transition -- References -- 20: The Aging Brain in Women: Impact of Steroid Replacement Therapies -- 20.1 Introduction -- 20.2 HRT and Female Cognitive Aging -- 20.2.1 Longitudinal and Observational Studies -- 20.2.2 Randomized Controlled Studies -- 20.3 Evidences and Perspectives in the Post-WHIMS Era -- References -- 21: Current Findings on Soya and Isoflavones -- 21.1 'Phytoestrogens'? A Misleading Term -- 21.2 The Oestrogen Beta Receptor Protects Against Excessive Hormonal Effects -- 21.3 The Significance of 3Ý Adiol in Menopause -- 21.3.1 Protective Effect of Isoflavones -- 21.4 Reduction of Menopausal Symptoms Demonstrated Beyond a Doubt -- 21.4.1 Isoflavones: Proven Safety in Controlled Studies -- 21.5 Effects of Tamoxifen Not Diminished -- 21.6 Protective Effects of Isoflavones Epidemiologically Confirmed
  • 21.7 Results of Asian Studies Are Transferable -- 21.8 Summary -- References -- 22: The Importance of Isoflavones for Women's Health -- 22.1 Endoplasmic Reticulum, Bones and Isoflavones -- 22.1.1 The Biophysical Background -- 22.1.2 Why Oestradiol Protects the Bone -- 22.2 The Importance of Oestrogen Receptors to the 'Unfolding Protein Response' -- 22.3 Epidemiological Data That Demonstrate the Safety of Isoflavones -- 22.4 The Complexity of Evolution -- 22.4.1 The two Oestrogen Receptors Can Be Selectively Activated -- 22.4.2 Does ER-ß Provide Protection from Hormone-Dependent Cancers? -- 22.4.3 Isoflavones Intervene in Paracrinology -- 22.4.4 Soya Isoflavones Influence the Metabolism of Oestrogen -- 22.5 Further Oncopreventive Mechanisms of Action by Isoflavones -- 22.5.1 VEGF (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor) -- 22.5.2 The RANK Ligand NF-kB -- References -- 23: Gender-Specific Hypertension -- 23.1 Gender-Specific Hypertension in Women in the Menopause -- 23.2 Gender-Specific Hypertension in Men with Involutive Hypoandrogenism -- Conclusion -- References -- Part VI: Hormone Therapies: What New? -- 24: Body Identical Hormone Replacement: The Way Forward? -- 24.1 Introduction -- 24.2 What Are Bio-identical Hormones? -- 24.3 Why Is There Controversy? -- 24.4 Are There Any Differences Between Bio-identical and Non-Bio-identical Hormones? -- 24.5 Does the Route of Administration Make a Difference? -- 24.6 Effect on the Cardiovascular System -- 24.7 Effect on Venous Thromboembolic (VTE) Risk -- 24.8 Endometrial Protection -- 24.9 Effect on the Breast -- 24.10 Global Consensus [19] and IMS Recommendations [20] -- Conclusions -- References -- Index
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9783319238654
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rdamedia
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