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The Resource Essays in Public Sector Entrepreneurship

Essays in Public Sector Entrepreneurship

Label
Essays in Public Sector Entrepreneurship
Title
Essays in Public Sector Entrepreneurship
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Series statement
International Studies in Entrepreneurship Ser.
Series volume
v.34
Essays in Public Sector Entrepreneurship
Label
Essays in Public Sector Entrepreneurship
Link
http://libproxy.rpi.edu/login?url=https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/rpi/detail.action?docID=4391608
Publication
Copyright
Related Contributor
Related Location
Related Agents
Related Authorities
Related Subjects
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Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Contents -- About the Contributors -- Chapter 1: Introduction -- Reference -- Chapter 2: Motivating Entrepreneurship and Innovative Activity: Analyzing US Policies and Programs -- 2.1 The Role of Innovation Policies in the United States -- 2.1.1 Knowledge, Entrepreneurship, and Innovation -- 2.1.2 The Role of Knowledge, R&D, and Innovation -- 2.1.2.1 Cohen and Levinthal's Absorptive Capacity Argument -- 2.1.2.2 The Individual Entrepreneur -- 2.1.2.3 The Geographical Dimension -- 2.1.3 The Knowledge Filter -- 2.1.4 Measuring and Identifying Innovative Firms -- 2.1.4.1 Surveys and Expert Panels -- 2.1.4.2 Codified Innovation: Patents -- 2.1.4.3 Forward Patent Citation Radicalness -- 2.1.4.4 Backward Patent Classification and Citations -- 2.1.5 Financing and Firm Size: How Small Firms Survive in Illiquid Capital Markets -- 2.1.6 Role of Public Support Programs in Reducing Market Failures in Financing of Small (and Young) Companies -- 2.1.7 The Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR) -- 2.1.7.1 Phase I -- 2.1.7.2 Phase II -- 2.1.7.3 Phase III -- 2.1.7.4 Selection Process of Wining Project and Criteria Needed to Select Awardees -- 2.1.7.5 Variation in the Role of Procurement Between Agencies -- 2.1.7.6 Assessment -- 2.1.7.7 SBIR Cofinancing and Crowding Out -- 2.1.7.8 The Role of Phase III -- 2.1.8 The Advanced Technology Program (ATP) -- 2.1.8.1 ATP Design -- 2.1.8.2 Assessment of ATP -- 2.1.9 The DARPA Program -- 2.1.10 The Role of Other US Agencies in Innovation -- 2.1.10.1 Technology Innovation Program (TIP) -- 2.1.10.2 Small Business Technology Transfer Program (STTR) -- 2.1.10.3 Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP) -- 2.1.11 Lessons that Can Be Learned from These Programs -- 2.2 The Role of Local Institutions (Universities and Regions/States)
  • 2.2.1 The Relevance of Universities and Regions/States in Fostering the Knowledge Economy -- 2.2.2 Complementarities between Centrally vs. Locally Based Policies -- 2.2.2.1 The Role of Universities and the Bayh-Dole Act in Economic Growth and Innovation -- 2.2.2.2 Role of Regions/States in Fostering the Knowledge Economy and Growth -- 2.3 Lessons from the US Programs -- 2.3.1 Does US Public Intervention Have a Positive Impact? -- 2.3.1.1 Crowding Out/Crowding In: Halo Effect -- 2.3.1.2 Geographical Diversification -- 2.3.2 Does US Public Intervention Show Characteristics that Drive Its Positive Impacts? -- 2.3.2.1 Agreeing on Innovation Targets -- 2.3.2.2 Creating Innovation Clusters -- 2.3.2.3 Coordination of Public Intervention -- 2.3.2.4 Cost-Efficient Management of Programs for Beneficiaries -- 2.3.2.5 University Technology Transfer Mechanisms -- References -- Chapter 3: Publicly Funded Principal Investigators as Transformative Agents of Public Sector Entrepreneurship -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 A Question of Definition: A Scientist, Administrator, Manager or Research Leader? -- 3.2.1 From an Agent of Science to an Agent of Economic Transformation: The Ambidextrous PI -- 3.2.2 Some Challenges and Tensions Facing Publicly Funded PIs -- 3.3 Study Framework -- 3.3.1 Large-Scale Survey -- 3.3.2 In-Depth Interviews -- 3.3.3 Our Focus -- 3.4 Findings -- 3.4.1 The Publicly Funded PI as Research Strategist -- 3.4.1.1 Strategic Behaviours of Publicly Funded PIs -- 3.4.2 PIs as Managers -- 3.4.2.1 The Managerial Nature of the PI Role -- 3.4.2.2 Managerial Challenges -- 3.4.2.2.1 Project Management -- 3.4.2.2.2 Project Adaptability -- 3.4.2.2.3 Project Network Management -- 3.4.3 PIs as Agents of Technology and Knowledge Transfer -- 3.4.3.1 Demands and Some Conditions for TT -- 3.4.3.2 Prevalent Technology and Knowledge Transfer Activities
  • 3.4.3.3 Factors Inhibiting TT -- 3.4.3.4 Factors Stimulating TT -- 3.5 Discussions and Implications -- 3.5.1 Publicly Funded PI Strategic Behaviour -- 3.5.2 Managerial Responsibilities of Publicly Funded PIs -- 3.5.3 Knowledge and TT -- 3.6 Recommendations and Final Reflections -- 3.6.1 Publicly Funded PIs: Strategising, Competencies and Skill Mix -- 3.6.1.1 Strategising -- 3.6.1.2 PI Competencies and Skill Mix -- 3.6.2 Role Supports -- 3.6.2.1 Recognition of the Managerial Nature of the Publicly Funded PI Role -- 3.6.2.2 Structured PI Professional Development -- 3.6.2.3 Research Administration and Support -- 3.6.2.4 Organisational Flexibility -- 3.6.3 Knowledge and TT -- 3.6.3.1 Effective TT Support -- 3.6.3.2 Industry Links -- 3.6.3.3 Resources for TT -- 3.6.4 Funders and Policymakers -- 3.6.5 Opportunities for Future Research -- References -- Chapter 4: An Innovation Policy Framework: Bridging the Gap Between Industrial Dynamics and Growth -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 What Drives Economic Growth? -- 4.2.1 Past and Current Mainstream Growth Paradigms -- 4.2.2 The Evolutionary Economic Models -- 4.2.3 The Systems of Innovation Approach -- 4.3 Linking Growth to Institutions -- 4.4 Key Agents in Turning Knowledge into Entrepreneurial Venturing and Large-Scale Production -- 4.4.1 From Educational Choice to Knowledge-Based Entrepreneurship -- 4.4.2 From Innovation to Large-Scale Production: The Crucial Agents -- 4.5 Key Institutions in Linking Knowledge to Innovative Entrepreneurship and Growth -- 4.5.1 Incentives in the Educational System -- 4.5.2 The Tax System -- 4.5.3 The Organization of Labor Markets -- 4.5.4 Institutions Providing Insurance and Governing the Channeling of Savings -- 4.5.5 Product Market Regulations, Entry, and Competition Policy -- 4.5.6 Agglomeration Economies, Housing Markets, and Infrastructure -- 4.6 Concluding Remarks
  • References -- Chapter 5: Radical and Incremental Innovation and the Role of University Scientist -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Knowledge Spillovers from Universities: Scientist Versus University Entrepreneurship -- 5.2.1 The Managed Economy -- 5.2.2 The Knowledge Economy -- 5.2.3 The Entrepreneurial Economy -- 5.2.4 University Entrepreneurship versus Scientist Entrepreneurship -- 5.3 Developing a Database -- 5.3.1 Introduction -- 5.3.2 Survey -- 5.3.2.1 Award Instrument -- 5.3.2.2 Number of Awards -- 5.3.2.3 NSF Funding Amount -- 5.3.2.4 Construction of Sample -- 5.3.2.5 Survey Administration -- 5.3.2.6 Survey Questionnaire -- 5.3.3 Salient Findings -- 5.3.3.1 Scientist Start-Ups -- 5.3.3.1.1 Scientist Start-Ups -- 5.3.3.1.2 Patents -- 5.3.3.1.3 Innovative Products -- 5.3.3.1.4 Consulting Services -- 5.3.3.1.5 Firm Success -- 5.3.3.2 Scientist Characteristics -- 5.3.3.2.1 Gender -- 5.3.3.2.2 Age -- 5.3.3.2.3 Country of Origin -- 5.3.3.3 Resources -- 5.3.3.3.1 Financial Resources -- 5.3.3.3.2 NSF Funding -- 5.3.3.3.3 Other Sources of Funding -- 5.3.3.3.4 Human Resources -- 5.3.3.3.5 Number of Student Collaborators -- 5.3.3.4 Scientist Human Capital -- 5.3.3.4.1 Tenure Status -- 5.3.3.4.2 Experience: Years in Tenured Status -- 5.3.3.5 Scientist Social Capital -- 5.3.3.5.1 Board Membership -- 5.3.3.6 Locational and Institutional Contexts -- 5.3.3.6.1 Region -- 5.3.3.6.2 Fields of Research -- 5.3.3.6.3 Management Inclination -- 5.3.3.6.4 Technology Transfer Office -- 5.4 Determinants of Scientist Entrepreneurship -- 5.4.1 The Model of Entrepreneurial Choice -- 5.4.2 Career Experience -- 5.4.3 Gender -- 5.4.4 Human Capital -- 5.4.5 Social Capital -- 5.4.6 Institutional Influences -- 5.4.7 Financial and Other Resources -- 5.5 Regression Results -- 5.5.1 Estimation Model -- 5.5.1.1 Dependent Variable -- 5.5.1.2 Independent Variables: Financial Resources
  • 5.5.1.3 Independent Variables: Human Resources -- 5.5.1.4 Independent Variables: Human Capital -- 5.5.1.5 Independent Variables: Social Capital -- 5.5.1.6 Independent Variables: Locational Context -- 5.5.1.7 Independent Variables: Institutional Context -- 5.5.1.8 Independent Variables: Scientist Demographic Controls -- 5.5.2 Scientist Start-Ups: All Fields of Research -- 5.5.3 Civil, Mechanical, and Manufacturing Innovation -- 5.5.4 Environmental Biology -- 5.5.5 Computer and Network Systems -- 5.5.6 Physical Oceanography -- 5.5.7 Particle and Nuclear Astrophysics -- 5.5.8 Biological Infrastructure -- 5.5.9 Summary of Scientist Entrepreneurship Determinants by Fields of Research -- 5.6 Incremental and Radical Innovation by Scientist Entrepreneurs -- 5.6.1 Scientist Start-Ups with Patents -- 5.6.2 Scientist Start-Ups with Innovative Products -- 5.6.3 Scientist Start-Ups with Consulting Services -- 5.6.4 Summary of Key Determinants -- 5.6.5 Scientist Firm Success with Patents and Innovative Products -- 5.7 Conclusions -- References -- Index
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{'f': 'http://opac.lib.rpi.edu/record=b4391189'}
Extent
1 online resource (220 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783319266770
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
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unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote

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