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The Resource Epicurean Meteorology : Sources, Method, Scope and Organization

Epicurean Meteorology : Sources, Method, Scope and Organization

Label
Epicurean Meteorology : Sources, Method, Scope and Organization
Title
Epicurean Meteorology
Title remainder
Sources, Method, Scope and Organization
Creator
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Series statement
Philosophia Antiqua Ser
Epicurean Meteorology : Sources, Method, Scope and Organization
Label
Epicurean Meteorology : Sources, Method, Scope and Organization
Link
http://libproxy.rpi.edu/login?url=https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/rpi/detail.action?docID=4585062
Publication
Copyright
Related Contributor
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Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • {u200E}Contents -- {u200E}Preface -- {u200E}List of Tables -- {u200E}List of Illustrations -- {u200E}List of Abbreviations -- {u200E}Chapter 1. General Introduction -- {u200E}Chapter 2. Multiple Explanations -- {u200E}2.1. Introduction -- {u200E}2.2. Preliminary Observations -- {u200E}2.2.1. Causes and Explanations -- {u200E}2.2.2. Variations in the Use of Multiple Explanations -- {u200E}2.3. Truth, Probability and Personal Preferences -- {u200E}2.3.1. Introduction -- {u200E}2.3.2. Are All Alternative Explanations True? -- {u200E}2.3.3. Contestation or Disagreement with Appearances -- {u200E}2.3.4. Incompatibility with Explanations of Other Phenomena -- {u200E}2.3.5. Non-Contestation and Analogy -- {u200E}2.3.6. Degrees of Probability and Personal Preferences -- {u200E}2.3.7. Lucretius' Supposed Preference for the Theories of Mathematical Astronomy -- {u200E}2.4. Multiple Explanations and Doxography -- {u200E}2.5. The Sources of the Method of Multiple Explanations -- {u200E}2.5.1. Introduction -- {u200E}2.5.2. Democritus -- {u200E}2.5.3. Aristotle -- {u200E}2.5.4. Theophrastus -- {u200E}2.5.5. The Syriac Meteorology -- {u200E}2.5.6. Conclusions about the Origins of the Method -- {u200E}2.6. Conclusions -- {u200E}Chapter 3. Range and Order of Subjects in Ancient Meteorology -- {u200E}3.1. Introduction -- {u200E}3.2. Range, Delimitation and Subdivisions of Meteorology -- {u200E}3.2.1. Introduction -- {u200E}3.2.2. The Texts -- {u200E}3.2.3. The Table -- {u200E}3.2.4. Some Observations -- {u200E}3.2.5. Some Conclusions -- {u200E}3.3. Terrestrial Phenomena Other Than Earthquakes -- {u200E}3.3.1. Lucretius -- {u200E}3.3.2. Parallels in Meteorology and Paradoxography -- {u200E}3.3.3. Conclusion -- {u200E}3.4. Order of Subjects -- {u200E}3.4.1. Introduction -- {u200E}3.4.2. The Table -- {u200E}3.4.3. Some Observations -- {u200E}3.4.4. Proposed Original Order of Subjects -- {u200E}3.4.5. Deviations from the Proposed Original Order -- {u200E}3.4.6. The Internal Structure of Chapters and Sections -- {u200E}3.5. Relations between the Four Texts -- {u200E}3.5.1. Epicurus' Letter to Pythocles and His "Other Meteorology"
  • {u200E}3.5.2. Lucretius DRN VI and Epicurus' "Other Meteorology" -- {u200E}3.5.3. Authorship and Identity of the Syriac Meteorology -- {u200E}3.5.4. Lucretius, Epicurus and the Syriac Meteorology -- {u200E}3.5.5. Aëtius' Placita and Theophrastus' Physical Opinions -- {u200E}3.5.6. Summary -- {u200E}3.6. Conclusions -- {u200E}3.7. Epilogue: Epicurean Cosmology and Astronomy -- {u200E}Chapter 4. The Shape of the Earth -- {u200E}4.1. Introduction -- {u200E}4.2. Historical and Conceptual Context -- {u200E}4.2.1. The Shape of the Earth in Antiquity: A Historical Overview -- {u200E}4.2.2. Ancient Proofs of the Earth's Sphericity -- {u200E}4.2.3. Epicurus' Ancient Critics -- {u200E}4.2.4. The Direction of Natural Motion and the Shape of the Earth -- {u200E}4.3. Discussion of Relevant Passages -- {u200E}4.3.1. The Rejection of Centrifocal Natural Motion (DRN I 1052ff.) -- {u200E}4.3.2. Downward Motion (DRN II 62-250) -- {u200E}4.3.3. The Apparent Proximity of the Sun (DRN IV 404-413) -- {u200E}4.3.4. Climatic Zones? (DRN V 204-205) -- {u200E}4.3.5. Lucretius' Cosmogony (DRN V 449-508) -- {u200E}4.3.6. Stability of the Earth (DRN V 534-563) -- {u200E}4.3.7. The Size of the Sun (DRN V 564-591) -- {u200E}4.3.8. Centrifocal Terminology (DRN V 621-636) -- {u200E}4.3.9. Sunrise and Sunset (DRN V 650-679) -- {u200E}4.3.10. The Earth's Conical Shadow (DRN V 762-770) -- {u200E}4.3.11. The 'Limp' of the Cosmic Axis (DRN VI 1107) -- {u200E}4.3.12. Philodemus and the Gnomon (Phil. De sign. 47.3-8) -- {u200E}4.4. Conclusions -- {u200E}1. Did the Epicureans Posit a Parallel Downward Motion of All Bodies? -- {u200E}2. Does Parallel Downward Motion Imply a Flat Earth? -- {u200E}3. Do Epicurean Astronomical Views Presuppose a Flat Earth? -- {u200E}4. Why Did the Epicureans Hold On to the Claim That the Earth is Flat? -- {u200E}5. Were They Familiar with Contemporary Astronomy? -- {u200E}6. Did They Know of the Astronomical Arguments for the Earth's Sphericity and Put Up a Reasoned Defence of Their Own Position? -- {u200E}Chapter 5. General Conclusions
  • {u200E}Appendix 1. Multiple Explanations in Epicurus' Letter to Pythocles -- {u200E}Appendix 2. Multiple Explanations in Lucretius' DRN V and VI -- {u200E}Appendix 3. General Structure of the Syriac Meteorology -- {u200E}Bibliography -- {u200E}Index Locorum -- {u200E}General Index
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Edition
1st ed.
Extent
1 online resource (313 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789004321588
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote

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