Coverart for item
The Resource Direct Speech in Nonnus' Dionysiaca : Narrative and Rhetorical Functions of the Characters' Varied and Many-Faceted Words

Direct Speech in Nonnus' Dionysiaca : Narrative and Rhetorical Functions of the Characters' Varied and Many-Faceted Words

Label
Direct Speech in Nonnus' Dionysiaca : Narrative and Rhetorical Functions of the Characters' Varied and Many-Faceted Words
Title
Direct Speech in Nonnus' Dionysiaca
Title remainder
Narrative and Rhetorical Functions of the Characters' Varied and Many-Faceted Words
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Series statement
Mnemosyne, Supplements, Late Antique Literature Ser.
Series volume
v.397
Direct Speech in Nonnus' Dionysiaca : Narrative and Rhetorical Functions of the Characters' Varied and Many-Faceted Words
Label
Direct Speech in Nonnus' Dionysiaca : Narrative and Rhetorical Functions of the Characters' Varied and Many-Faceted Words
Link
http://libproxy.rpi.edu/login?url=https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/rpi/detail.action?docID=4727829
Publication
Copyright
Related Contributor
Related Location
Related Agents
Related Authorities
Related Subjects
Related Items
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • {u200E}Contents -- {u200E}Preface -- {u200E}Abbreviations -- {u200E}Acknowledgements -- {u200E}Introduction -- {u200E}Variation or Incoherence -- Virtue or Vice? -- {u200E}1880-1943: The "Problem" of Unity and Structure -- {u200E}Since 1964: Advocating the Principle of {u202D}srlmlnl"α{u202C} -- {u200E}Direct Speech in the Dionysiaca -- {u200E}Scholarly Research on Direct Speech in Greek Epic Poetry -- {u200E}Homer, Apollonius, Quintus and Nonnus Compared: Statistical Data -- {u200E}Objectives and Approaches -- {u200E}A Comparative Approach -- {u200E}A Narratological Point of View -- {u200E}A Rhetorical Model of Analysis -- {u200E}On the Structure of This Book -- {u200E}Overview of Chapters 1-6 -- {u200E}Part 1. Epic Speech in Transformation -- {u200E}Chapter 1. Imitation and Transformation: From Troy to India and from Medea to Morrheus -- {u200E}1.1. Speeches and Dialogues in the {u202D}Elr!w Ü̓sα"xj{u202C} Episode -- {u200E}1.1.1. Hera and Aphrodite -- {u200E}1.1.2. Hera and Hypnus -- {u200E}1.2. A Speech for a Speech: Apollonius Inverted -- {u200E}1.2.1. Arguing for and against: Aphrodite's Double Role -- {u200E}1.2.2. From Medea to Morrheus: Torn between Contradictory Feelings -- {u200E}1.3. Nonnus and Quintus (or Libanius): {u202D}Xl"pαw Ü̓̀p fl%"srl nr"dryw{u202C} -- -- {u200E}1.3.1. What Achilles and Penthesilea Would Have Said -- {u200E}1.4. Speech Composition and Narrative Structures -- {u200E}Chapter 2. Types of Epic Speech: The Battle Exhortation -- {u200E}2.1. Defining the Corpus: The Epic and the Historiographical Tradition -- {u200E}2.2. Exhortations in Nonnus: Subtypes of the Battle Exhortation -- {u200E}2.2.1. Generals' Exhortations -- {u200E}2.2.2. Exhortations by Gods (in Disguise) -- {u200E}2.2.3. Other Types of Battle Exhortations -- {u200E}2.2.4. Tradition and Innovation -- {u200E}2.3. Exhortative Topoi and Recurring Motifs in Nonnus -- {u200E}2.3.1. {u202D}El"mαlrp{u202C} -- {u200E}2.3.2. {u202D}Vyozf"urp{u202C}/{u202D}f%mβjvr"ofprp{u202C} -- {u200E}2.3.3. {u202D}Mαnr"p{u202C} -- {u200E}2.3.4. {u202D}Eypαxr"p{u202C} -- {u200E}2.3.5. Particularities of the "Nonnian" Exhortation -- {u200E}2.4. Selected Examples: Untraditional Exhortations in Nonnus
  • {u200E}2.4.1. Typhon's Army of Monsters -- {u200E}2.4.2. Pentheus and Lycurgus as Spurious Generals -- {u200E}2.4.3. Inverse Exhortations -- {u200E}2.4.4. Love on the Battlefield -- {u200E}2.5. Epic and Rhetorical Conventions -- {u200E}Chapter 3. Speeches within Speeches -- {u200E}3.1. Potential {u202D}xlw{u202C}-Speech in Nonnus: A Homeric Device Revived -- {u200E}3.1.1. Defining Potential {u202D}xlw{u202C}-Speech in Nonnus -- {u200E}3.1.2. Nonnus' Potential {u202D}xlw{u202C}-Speech and the Literary Tradition -- {u200E}3.1.3. New Wine in Old Vessels -- {u200E}3.2. More Hypothetical Speeches -- {u200E}3.2.1. First Person Potential Speeches -- {u200E}3.2.2. Messenger Requests -- {u200E}3.2.3. Procatalepsis -- {u200E}3.2.4. Third Person "Desired" Speeches -- {u200E}3.3. Hypothetical Speech, a "Nonnian" Device -- {u200E}Part 2. Rhetoric and Narrative -- {u200E}Chapter 4. The Rhetoric of Deception: Persuasive Strategies -- {u200E}4.1. Deceptive Speeches -- {u200E}4.1.1. Defining the Corpus -- {u200E}4.1.2. Manipulation at Work -- {u200E}4.2. Speaking in Disguise: {u202D}j%̃krw{u202C}, {u202D}sα"krw{u202C} and Authority -- {u200E}4.3. Hera's Deception of Semele: A Case Study -- {u200E}4.3.1. Phthonus to Hera (and Athena) -- {u200E}4.3.2. Hera to Apate -- {u200E}4.3.3. Hera to Semele -- {u200E}4.3.4. Step by Step: {u202D}zkr"prw{u202C} and {u202D}Ü̓sα"xj{u202C} in the Story of Semele -- {u200E}4.4. True or False? As Long as It is Artful -- {u200E}Chapter 5. Ecphrastic Ethopoeae and the Perspective of the Text-Internal Observer -- {u200E}5.1. Suddenly Appearing Characters and Their Speeches -- {u200E}5.1.1. Anonymous Observers -- {u200E}5.1.2. Mythological Figures -- {u200E}5.1.3. Divine Observers -- {u200E}5.1.4. The Voice of the Text-Internal Observer -- {u200E}5.2. Looking through the Text-Internal Observer's Eyes -- {u200E}5.2.1. About Europa -- {u200E}5.2.2. About Cadmus and Harmonia -- {u200E}5.2.3. About Semele -- {u200E}5.2.4. Other Examples of the Same Interpretative Technique -- {u200E}5.2.5. Ekphrasis, Interpretation and "Cultural Competence" in the Description of Beauty -- {u200E}5.3. Comments from Above -- {u200E}5.3.1. Hera about Europa and Zeus
  • {u200E}5.3.2. Selene about Harmonia and Cadmus -- {u200E}5.3.3. Semele about Dionysus -- {u200E}5.3.4. Semele about Ino -- {u200E}5.3.5. Aphrodite about Morrheus and Chalcomede -- {u200E}5.3.6. Humour and the Divine Perspective -- {u200E}5.4. A Double Role -- {u200E}Chapter 6. Rhetoric of Seduction and Failure of Communication in the Beroe Episode -- {u200E}6.1. Amatory Rhetoric: The Case of the {u202D}sαukf"prl zydr"efoprl{u202C} -- {u200E}6.2. Beirut and Beroe -- {u200E}6.3. Dionysus and Poseidon Courting Beroe: A Series of Amorous Approaches -- {u200E}6.3.1. Dionysus to Beroe (1) -- {u200E}6.3.2. Dionysus to Beroe (2) -- {u200E}6.3.3. Dionysus to Beroe (3) -- {u200E}6.3.4. Dionysus to Beroe (4) -- {u200E}6.3.5. Poseidon to Beroe -- {u200E}6.4. Fruitless Metaphors and Arguments Unheard -- {u200E}Conclusion -- {u200E}One More Speech: Aura's Last Words -- {u200E}{u202D}Ry%" s} oỹkrw f%"njdf{u202C}: General Observations on Direct Speech in Nonnus -- {u200E}Appendix -- {u200E}Summary of the Dionysiaca -- {u200E}Books 1-8: A Lengthy Prequel to the Story of Dionysus -- {u200E}Books 9-12: Dionysus' Childhood and Youth -- {u200E}Books 13-24: The Expedition to India -- {u200E}Books 25-40.297: The War in India -- {u200E}Books 40.298-248: The Way Back Home -- {u200E}Bibliography -- {u200E}General Index -- {u200E}Index Locorum
http://library.link/vocab/cover_art
https://contentcafe2.btol.com/ContentCafe/Jacket.aspx?Return=1&Type=S&Value=9789004334656&userID=ebsco-test&password=ebsco-test
Dimensions
unknown
http://library.link/vocab/discovery_link
{'f': 'http://opac.lib.rpi.edu/record=b4369865'}
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
1 online resource (342 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789004334656
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote

Library Locations

    • Folsom LibraryBorrow it
      110 8th St, Troy, NY, 12180, US
      42.729766 -73.682577
Processing Feedback ...