Coverart for item
The Resource Data Protection and Privacy

Data Protection and Privacy

Label
Data Protection and Privacy
Title
Data Protection and Privacy
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Series statement
Issues in Privacy and Data Protection
Data Protection and Privacy
Label
Data Protection and Privacy
Link
http://libproxy.rpi.edu/login?url=https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/rpi/detail.action?docID=4801170
Publication
Copyright
Related Contributor
Related Location
Related Agents
Related Authorities
Related Subjects
Related Items
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Foreword -- Contents -- Contributors -- About the Authors -- About the Editors -- Part I: Fundamental and Legal Questions -- Chapter 1: Legal Fundamentalism: Is Data Protection Really a Fundamental Right? -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 The Disconnection of Data Protection from the Right to Privacy -- 1.3 The Fundamentalisation of Data Protection -- 1.4 What Is a Fundamental Right? -- 1.5 Is Data Protection a Fundamental Right? -- 1.6 Conclusion -- Bibliography -- Chapter 2: Is There a Right to Offline Alternatives in a Digital World? -- 2.1 Introd uction -- 2.2 Context of the Problem: Why We Should Think About a Right to Remain Offline? -- 2.2.1 The Value of Established Practices -- 2.2.2 Basic Services and Their Dependence on Network Technologies -- 2.2.3 Autonomy and Individual Property -- 2.2.4 The Right to Remain Offline: An Individualist Approach to Societal Problems -- 2.2.5 Individual Privacy vs. Public Benefits -- 2.3 How Reasonable Is a Right to Offline Alternatives? -- 2.3.1 To Be or Not To Be in the Network - Is Not the Question -- 2.3.2 Techniques of De-networking: Social Relations in Absence of Interaction -- 2.3.3 Why We (Can) Have a Right to Offline Alternatives -- 2.4 What Is the Legal Status Quo? -- 2.4.1 To Set the Scene: The "eCall Regulation" -- 2.4.2 Legal Standard: Art. 7, 8 of the Charter -- Scope -- Restriction -- Justification -- 2.4.3 Conclusion -- 2.5 Offline Alternatives in EU Policy Debates -- 2.5.1 The Right to the Silence of the Chips on the European Policy Agenda -- 2.5.2 A Paradigm Shift in European Politics? -- 2.5.3 Digital Sovereignty, Algorithmic Regulation and the Individual -- 2.6 Conclusion -- Bibliography -- Chapter 3: What Is New with the Internet of Things in Privacy and Data Protection? Four Legal Challenges on Sharing and Control in IoT -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 IoT and Structural Data Sharing
  • 3.2.1 Levels of IoT -- 3.2.2 Layers of IoT -- 3.3 IoT and Groups -- 3.3.1 The Meaning of a Group -- 3.3.2 Group Privacy and Collective Data Protection -- 3.3.3 A Look into the Future -- 3.4 Agents Control -- 3.4.1 Technological Convergence: On Robots and Data Controllers in IoE -- 3.5 Standards -- 3.6 Conclusions -- References -- Part II: Concepts and Tools -- Chapter 4: Towards a Code of Conduct on Privacy for mHealth to Foster Trust Amongst Users of Mobile Health Applications -- 4.1 Introduction: mHealth and the Problems with Trust -- 4.1.1 Trust and Data Protection Law -- 4.1.2 An Industry Code of Conduct to Foster Trust Amongst Users of Mobile Health Applications: Structure and Main Provisions -- Context and Aims -- Structure and Main Provisions -- Definition of Health Data -- 4.1.3 The Sphere of User Control -- Granular Consent -- Control Over Advertisements -- Children and Parental Consent -- Transparent Information, Data Portability and Data Subjects' Rights -- Wrap Up -- 4.1.4 The Sphere of Technical and Organisational Measures -- Data Controller and Data Processor -- Incorporating Data Protection by Design and Data Protection by Default in Apps -- Secondary Uses of Data -- Conducting a Privacy Impact Assessment -- Adherence and Compliance -- 4.2 Conclusion -- Bibliography -- Chapter 5: Minimum Harm by Design: Reworking Privacy by Design to Mitigate the Risks of Surveillance -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Contemporary Surveillance: Classify, Predict, Exclude -- 5.3 Surveillance Uses of Technologies -- 5.4 Privacy: Family Resemblances and Contextual Integrity -- 5.5 Shortcomings of PbD Applied to Surveillance -- 5.6 Reworking PbD: Abandon the Win-Win Postulate and Broaden the Range of Harms -- 5.7 MHbD: Linking Surveillance Mechanisms, Values and Harms -- Summary, Limitations of the Proposed Approach and Outlook -- Bibliography
  • Chapter 6: A Purpose-Based Taxonomy for Better Governance of Personal Data in the Internet of Things Era: The Example of Wellness Data -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.1.1 The Need for a New Taxonomy for the Protection of Wellness Data -- Protection of Personal Data as It Used to Be: Anonymization and De-identification -- Protection of Personal Data as It Could Be: A Purpose-Based Taxonomy of Wellness Data -- 6.1.2 Quantified Self -- Definition -- Prospective Use Cases -- Benefits and Risks -- Policy Options: Contextual Integrity and Provider Acountability -- 6.1.3 Predictive Personalization -- Definition -- Prospective Use Cases -- Benefits and Risks -- Policy Options: Transparency Through Portability and Through the Right of Information -- 6.1.4 Health Data -- Definition -- Prospective Use Cases -- Benefits and Risks -- Policy Options: Accessibility Through a Data Clearing House -- 6.1.5 Conclusion -- Chapter 7: A Privacy Engineering Framework for the Internet of Things -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.1.1 The Internet of Things -- 7.1.2 Privacy, a Transversal Problem -- 7.1.3 IoT Ecosystems -- 7.1.4 The Need for Privacy Engineering Guidelines -- 7.2 Privacy in the Internet of Things -- 7.2.1 Internet of Things Architecture -- 7.2.2 RERUM Architecture and Privacy Controls for the IoT -- 7.2.3 Comparison with Other Solutions -- 7.2.4 Recommendations for Privacy Engineering in IoT -- 7.3 Understanding Privacy Engineering -- 7.3.1 Privacy Engineering in Organisations -- 7.3.2 The Need for a Privacy Engineering Framework -- 7.3.3 Analysis of Privacy Engineering -- Privacy Engineering -- Privacy Engineering Objectives -- Properties for Privacy Protection -- Privacy Engineering Lifecycle -- Operationalisation of Privacy Principles -- Application of Design Strategies -- Integration of Risk Management -- 7.4 Privacy Engineering Framework for the IoT
  • 7.4.1 Structure of a Privacy Engineering Framework -- 7.4.2 Concepts in the Framework -- Privacy Engineering and Privacy-by-Design -- Privacy Engineering Objectives -- Privacy Protection Properties -- Privacy Engineering Principles -- 7.4.3 Stakeholders in the Framework -- 7.4.4 Processes in the Framework -- Privacy Control Requirements for IoT -- Design of Privacy Controls for IoT -- 7.4.5 Organisations in the Framework -- Environment & Infrastructure for IoT -- Lifecycle Approach for IoT -- 7.5 Conclusions -- References -- Part IV: Closing -- Chapter 8: Dangers from Within? Looking Inwards at the Role of Maladministration as the Leading Cause of Health Data Breaches in the UK -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.1.1 Outline -- 8.2 An Interdisciplinary Study into the Abuse of Health and Biomedical Data in the UK -- 8.2.1 Methodological Limitations -- 8.3 Maladministration in a Broader Context -- 8.4 Triangulating Cause and Effect -- 8.4.1 Careless and Negligent Abuse of Data -- 8.4.2 The Preventability of Maladministration and the Unavoidability of Human Error -- 8.5 Good Governance to Prevent Maladministration: Case Studies of Poor Governance -- 8.5.1 'Safe' Havens? Unauthorised Disclosures of Patient Data -- Key Facts -- Nature of the Incident -- Causal Factors -- Impact/Harm as a Result -- Recommendations -- 8.5.2 Issues with Out-Sourcing: Non-secure Disposal of Patient Data -- Key Facts -- Nature of the Incident -- Causal Factors -- Impact/Harm as a Result -- Recommendations -- 8.5.3 Carelessness and Harm: The Long-Term Impact of Human Error -- Key Facts -- Nature of the Incident -- Casual Factors -- Impact/Harm as a Result -- Recommendations -- 8.5.4 Lost But Not Found: A Case for Encryption -- Key Facts -- Nature of the Incident -- Causal Factors -- Impact/Harm as a Result -- Recommendations -- 8.6 Conclusion -- Bibliography
  • Chapter 9: On the Road to Privacy- and Data Protection-Friendly Security Technologies in the Workplace - A Case-Study of the MUSES Risk and Trust Analysis Engine -- 9.1 Introduction: The Tension Between Privacy, Data Protection and Company Security Technologies -- 9.2 Legal Background: Privacy and Data Protection in the Workplace -- 9.2.1 Protection of the Private Life of Employees -- 9.2.2 Protection of the Personal Data of Employees -- Wide Array of Data Protection Legislation -- General Data Protection Regulation -- Notions of 'Personal Data' and 'Processing of Personal Data' -- Formal Requirement to Respect the Law -- Legal Ground for the Processing of Personal Data -- Substantive Requirements for the Processing of Personal Data -- Rights of the Data Subject -- Obligation to Take Security Measures and to Keep Records of Processing Activities -- 9.3 Challenge: Bringing Privacy and Data Protection in the Design of Security Technologies -- 9.3.1 Privacy and Data Protection by Design as an Obligation for the Data Controller -- 9.3.2 Technical Solution: Privacy and Data Protection Engineering -- 9.4 Use Case: Privacy and Data Protection in the MUSES Risk and Trust Analysis Engine -- 9.4.1 Overall Approach for the Design of MUSES -- 9.4.2 Technical Background: MUSES RT2AE Component -- 9.4.3 Application of Four Key Guidelines Considering the Lifecycle of the Data in MUSES -- 9.4.4 Technical Application to the Four Stages of the Data Lifecycle in MUSES -- Data Collection -- Data Storage -- Data Erasure -- Data Analysis -- 9.5 Conclusion -- Bibliography -- Chapter 10: A Study on Corporate Compliance with Transparency Requirements of Data Protection Law -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 Related Work -- 10.3 Quantitative Analysis of State of Practice in Personal Data Processing with Honeypots -- 10.3.1 Approach and Testing Environment
  • 10.3.2 Requirements of German Law Against Unfair Competition (UWG) on e-Mail Advertisement
http://library.link/vocab/cover_art
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Dimensions
unknown
http://library.link/vocab/discovery_link
{'f': 'http://opac.lib.rpi.edu/record=b4266710'}
Extent
1 online resource (309 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783319507965
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote

Library Locations

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