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The Resource Cardiac Management of Oncology Patients : Clinical Handbook for Cardio-Oncology

Cardiac Management of Oncology Patients : Clinical Handbook for Cardio-Oncology

Label
Cardiac Management of Oncology Patients : Clinical Handbook for Cardio-Oncology
Title
Cardiac Management of Oncology Patients
Title remainder
Clinical Handbook for Cardio-Oncology
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
  • This book is designed for clinical cardiologists and other physicians working with cardiac patients, where specific specialized teams of cardio-oncologists are not available and who are called to perform a clinical consultation to evaluate both the cardiac condition and the eligibility for chemotherapy or radiotherapy treatment, and to evaluate if a cancer treatment produces toxic effects on a patient treated with chemo or radiotherapy and if appearance of new symptoms is due to this treatment. In recent years, progress in oncologic therapy has resulted in important developments and the prognostic improvement of patients with malignancy. The cornerstone of chemotherapy are the anthracyclines (and the analogue Mitoxantrone), that are direct cellular toxic agents and that are among the most powerful anti-neoplastic drugs, but their cardiac toxicity is well known. Significant breakthroughs in cancer therapy have also been achieved with the introduction of signalling inhibitors, such as VEGF inhibitors, HERB2 inhibitors or TK inhibitors used alone or in combination with direct cellular toxic drugs. However, these signalling inhibitors may interact also with cardiovascular signalling and therefore may have functional or structural effects on the myocardium. This can be permanent or reversible, with impairment of the global conditions and important side effects, and increase both morbidity and mortality and worsening of quality of life. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy can have acute detrimental effects that can be present for years after treatment and that can lead to cardiac consequences also after long periods of no clinic sequelae. Patient numbers with cancer problems will dramatically increase in the next years and thus every cardiologist will need to have the correct information and the skills to manage these situations in the correct way. This book
  • will provide these tools for them
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Cardiac Management of Oncology Patients : Clinical Handbook for Cardio-Oncology
Label
Cardiac Management of Oncology Patients : Clinical Handbook for Cardio-Oncology
Link
http://libproxy.rpi.edu/login?url=https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/rpi/detail.action?docID=2094453
Publication
Copyright
Related Contributor
Related Location
Related Agents
Related Authorities
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Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Acknowledgements -- Contents -- Contributors -- Chapter 1: Introduction -- 1.1 Who Is This Book Suitable For? -- 1.2 Why a Book on Cardio-oncology? -- 1.3 The "Sliding Doors" Concept -- 1.4 Brief Historic Data on Chemotherapy -- 1.4.1 The Beginning -- 1.4.2 Nitrogen Mustard Derivatives -- 1.4.3 Antifolates -- 1.4.4 Vinca Alkaloids -- 1.4.5 Cisplatin -- 1.4.6 Anthracyclines -- 1.4.7 Taxanes -- 1.4.8 Hormones -- 1.4.9 Present Days -- 1.4.10 Combination Therapy -- 1.4.11 Adjuvant and Neoadjuvant Therapy -- 1.4.12 Autologous Bone Marrow Transplantation -- 1.4.13 Supportive Care During Chemotherapy -- 1.4.14 Target Therapy -- 1.4.15 Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors -- 1.4.16 Monoclonal Antibodies -- 1.5 Epidemiologic Data: The Numbers of the  Cardio-{u00AD}Oncologic Problem -- 1.5.1 Worldwide Cancer Incidence [10, 11] -- 1.5.1.1 United States Data [11] -- 1.5.1.2 European Data [12] -- 1.5.2 Childhood Cancer Survivors -- Bibliography -- Chapter 2: Physiopathology and Toxic Heart Effects of Chemotherapy Drugs -- 2.1 General Principles -- 2.2 Not Only Heart Failure -- 2.3 Type I Agents -- 2.3.1 Anthracyclines -- 2.3.1.1 Introduction -- 2.3.1.2 Dose Relationship and Risk Factors for Cardiac Toxicity of Anthracyclines -- 2.3.1.3 Cardiac Morphology and Histopathological Modifications in Anthracycline Toxicity -- 2.3.1.4 Mechanism of Anthracycline Toxicity -- 2.3.1.5 Clinical Expressions of Anthracycline Toxicity -- 2.3.1.6 Diagnosis of Anthracycline Toxicity -- 2.3.1.7 Assessment of Left Ventricular Function -- 2.3.1.8 Prevention of Anthracycline Cardiac Toxicity [30-32, 50] -- 2.3.1.9 Prevention Strategy of Anthracycline Cardiac Toxicity -- 2.3.1.10 Treatment and Management -- 2.3.1.11 Mitoxantrone -- 2.3.2 Fluoropyrimidines (5-FU and Capecitabine) -- 2.3.2.1 Introduction -- 2.3.2.2 Epidemiology of Fluoropyrimidine Toxicity
  • 2.3.2.3 Dose Relationship and Risk Factors for Cardiac Toxicity of Fluoropyrimidines -- 2.3.2.4 Cardiac Morphology and Histopathological Modifications in Fluoropyrimidine Toxicity -- 2.3.2.5 Mechanism of Fluoropyrimidine Toxicity -- 2.3.2.6 Clinical Expressions of Fluoropyrimidine Toxicity -- 2.3.2.7 Diagnosis of Fluoropyrimidine Cardiac Toxicity -- 2.3.2.8 Prevention and Prevention Strategy of Fluoropyrimidine Cardiac Toxicity -- 2.3.2.9 Treatment and Management of Fluoropyrimidine Toxicity -- 2.3.3 Alkylating Agents [59] -- 2.3.3.1 Cyclophosphamide and Nitrogen Mustards -- 2.3.3.2 Aziridines and Epoxides -- 2.3.3.3 Alkyl Sulfonates -- 2.3.3.4 Nitrosoureas -- 2.3.3.5 Triazenes, Hydrazines, and Related Compounds -- 2.3.3.6 Hexamethylmelamine -- 2.3.3.7 Dose Relationship and Risk Factors for Cardiac Toxicity of Cyclophosphamide and Other Alkylating Agents -- 2.3.3.8 Cardiac Morphology and Histopathological Modifications in Cyclophosphamide and Other Alkylating Agents' Toxicity -- 2.3.3.9 Mechanism of Cyclophosphamide and Other Alkylating Agents' Toxicity -- 2.3.3.10 Clinical Expressions of Cyclophosphamide and Other Alkylating Agents' Toxicity -- 2.3.3.11 Diagnosis of Cyclophosphamide and Other Alkylating Agents' Toxicity -- 2.3.3.12 Prevention of Cyclophosphamide and Other Alkylating Agents' Cardiac Toxicity -- 2.3.3.13 Treatment and Management of Cyclophosphamide and Other Alkylating Agents' Cardiac Toxicity -- 2.3.4 Platinum Compounds -- 2.3.4.1 Mechanism of Toxicity -- 2.3.4.2 Dose Relationship and Risk Factors for Cardiac Toxicity of Platinum Compounds -- 2.3.4.3 Clinical Expressions of Platinum Compound Cardiac Toxicity -- 2.3.4.4 Prevention of Platinum Compound Cardiac Toxicity -- 2.3.4.5 Treatment and Management Platinum Compound Cardiac Toxicity -- 2.3.5 Anti-microtubule Agents -- 2.3.5.1 Taxanes -- 2.3.5.2 Paclitaxel -- Introduction
  • Mechanism of Paclitaxel Toxicity -- Clinical Expressions of Paclitaxel Toxicity -- Prevention of Paclitaxel Cardiac Toxicity -- 2.3.5.3 Docetaxel -- Introduction -- Dose Relationship and Risk Factors for Cardiac Toxicity of Docetaxel -- 2.3.5.4 Vinca Alkaloids -- Vinblastine -- Vincristine -- Clinical Expressions of Vinca Alkaloid Toxicity -- Dose Relationship and Risk Factors for Cardiac Toxicity of Vinca Alkaloids -- 2.4 Type II Agents -- 2.4.1 Biological Agents -- 2.4.1.1 Monoclonal Antibodies -- Mechanism of Monoclonal Antibody Toxicity -- Cardiac Morphology and Histopathological Modifications in Cardiac Toxicity of Monoclonal Antibodies -- Dose Relationship and Risk Factors for Cardiac Toxicity of Monoclonal Antibodies -- Clinical Expressions of Monoclonal Antibody Toxicity -- Alemtuzumab -- Bevacizumab -- Trastuzumab -- Pertuzumab -- Rituximab -- Cetuximab -- Sorafenib and Sunitinib -- Imatinib -- Lapatinib -- Treatment Management and Prevention of Monoclonal Antibody Toxicity -- 2.4.1.2 Cytokines -- Interleukins -- Interferons -- 2.4.1.3 Miscellaneous Agents -- All-Trans Retinoic Acid -- Arsenic Trioxide -- Pentostatin -- Thalidomide -- Etoposide -- Homoharringtonine -- 2.4.1.4 Endocrine Agents -- Bibliography -- Chapter 3: Radiotherapy Heart Effects -- 3.1 Introduction [1, 2] -- 3.2 Risk Factors and Dose Relationship for Cardiac Toxicity Due to Radiotherapy -- 3.3 Pathophysiologic Mechanisms, Cardiac Morphology, and Histopathological Modifications of Cardiac Toxicity Due to Radiotherapy -- 3.3.1 Myocardium -- 3.3.2 Pericardium -- 3.3.3 Valves -- 3.3.4 Coronary Arteries -- 3.3.5 Cerebrovascular Disease -- 3.3.6 Carotid Artery Disease -- 3.4 Clinical Expressions of Radiotherapy Cardiac Toxicity -- 3.5 Treatment of Radiotherapy-Related Heart Complications [1, 2] -- 3.6 Follow-Up for Cardiac Toxicity Due  to Radiotherapy [1, 2]
  • 3.7 Prevention and Prevention Strategy of Cardiac Toxicity Due to Radiotherapy [1] -- 3.7.1 Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy (3D-CRT) -- 3.7.2 Intensity-Modulated RT (IMRT) -- 3.7.3 IGRT -- 3.7.4 Four-Dimensional RT -- 3.7.5 Adaptive Therapy -- 3.7.6 Stereotactic RT -- 3.7.7 Tomotherapy and Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy -- 3.7.8 Electron Beam Radiation Therapy -- 3.7.9 Proton and Charged Particle Therapy -- 3.7.10 Brachytherapy -- 3.7.11 Thoracic RT -- Bibliography -- Chapter 4: Cardiac Imaging Technology in Cardio-oncology -- 4.1 Echocardiography -- 4.1.1 Introduction -- 4.1.2 Systolic Function -- 4.1.3 Contrast Echo -- 4.1.4 3D Echo -- 4.1.5 Diastolic Dysfunction -- 4.1.6 Strain -- 4.1.7 Stress Echocardiography and Cardiotoxicity -- 4.1.8 Conclusion -- 4.2 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance -- 4.2.1 Introduction -- 4.2.2 Ventricular Function/Volumes and Mass -- 4.2.3 Strain Imaging -- 4.2.4 T2 in Cardiotoxicity -- 4.2.5 Late Gadolinium Enhancement -- 4.2.6 T1 Mapping -- 4.2.7 Cardiac and Pericardial Metastases -- 4.2.8 Conclusion -- 4.2.8.1 CMR: One-Stop Strategy -- 4.2.8.2 CMR Is a Radiation-Free Method -- 4.3 Radionuclide Imaging -- 4.3.1 Introduction -- 4.3.2 Multiple-Gated Cardiac Blood Pool Imaging (MUGA) -- 4.3.3 Ionizing Radiation -- 4.3.4 Gated Single Photon Emission Tomography (SPECT) -- 4.3.5 SPECT Versus MUGA -- 4.3.6 PET -- 4.3.7 Targeted Cardiac Imaging -- 4.3.8 123I-Labeled MIBG Scintigraphy -- 4.3.9 Conclusion -- Bibliography -- Chapter 5: Evaluation of the Oncologic Patient Before, During, and After Chemotherapy -- 5.1 Is the Patient a Good Candidate for Chemotherapy/Radiotherapy? -- 5.2 What Do I Have to Do Before the Beginning of the Therapy? -- 5.2.1 Anthracyclines -- 5.2.2 HER2 Inhibitors -- 5.2.3 Fluoropyrimidines -- 5.2.4 VEGF Inhibitors -- 5.2.5 Thalidomide, Lenalidomide, Cisplatin, Vorinostat, and TKI Inhibitors
  • 5.3 When Symptoms Develop -- 5.3.1 Dyspnea -- 5.3.2 Palpitations -- 5.3.3 Chest Pain -- 5.3.4 Edema -- 5.3.5 Weakness -- 5.3.6 Thromboembolism -- 5.4 Is There a Role for Biological Markers? -- 5.4.1 Troponin -- 5.4.2 Natriuretic Peptides -- 5.4.2.1 Baseline and Monitoring (Each Cycle) -- 5.5 How and When Possible Toxicity Must Be Evaluated? -- 5.5.1 QT Prolongation -- 5.5.2 Radiotherapy -- Bibliography -- Chapter 6: Specific Clinic Problems in Cancer Therapy Cardiac Toxicity Complications -- 6.1 Acute Cardiotoxicity -- 6.1.1 Symptoms -- 6.1.2 Signs -- 6.1.3 Clinic -- 6.1.4 Anthracycline -- 6.1.5 Fluoropyrimidines -- 6.1.6 Alkylating Agents -- 6.1.7 Platinum Compounds -- 6.1.8 Antimicrotubule Agents -- 6.1.9 Perspectives in Cardioprotection from Acute Cardiotoxicity -- 6.1.10 Treatment -- 6.2 Chronic Cardiotoxicity -- 6.2.1 Causes of Late Cardiovascular Effects in Cancer Survivors -- 6.2.2 Myocardial Dysfunction -- 6.2.3 Structural Diseases -- 6.2.3.1 Valve Degeneration -- 6.2.3.2 Pericardial Disease -- 6.2.3.3 Arrhythmias -- 6.2.4 Vascular Diseases -- 6.2.4.1 Arterial Hypertension -- 6.2.4.2 Arterial and Venous Thrombosis -- 6.3 Systolic Dysfunction -- 6.4 Hypertension: How to Evaluate, How to Prevent, and How to Treat -- 6.4.1 Prevention -- 6.4.2 Patient Management (Fig. 6.9) -- 6.4.3 Cancer Drugs and Hypertension -- 6.4.4 Diagnosis -- 6.4.5 Treatment -- 6.4.5.1 Nonpharmacological Approach -- 6.4.5.2 Drug Treatment -- 6.5 Coronary Disease and Thromboembolic Problems -- 6.5.1 Introduction -- 6.5.2 Oncologic Therapy as a Cause for Ischemic Heart Disease or Thromboembolic Complications -- 6.5.3 Radiotherapy and Ischemic Heart Disease -- 6.5.4 Chemotherapy and Ischemic Heart Disease -- 6.5.4.1 Coronary Vasospasm -- 6.5.5 Treatment of Ischemic Heart Disease -- 6.5.6 Acute Ischemic Heart Disease -- 6.5.7 Chronic Ischemic Heart Disease
  • 6.5.8 Treatment for Acute Coronary Syndromes That Unravels Oncological Conditions
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{'f': 'http://opac.lib.rpi.edu/record=b4383014'}
Extent
1 online resource (264 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783319158082
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote

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