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The Resource Beyond the formalist-realist divide : the role of politics in judging, Brian Z. Tamanaha

Beyond the formalist-realist divide : the role of politics in judging, Brian Z. Tamanaha

Label
Beyond the formalist-realist divide : the role of politics in judging
Title
Beyond the formalist-realist divide
Title remainder
the role of politics in judging
Statement of responsibility
Brian Z. Tamanaha
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
According to conventional wisdom in American legal culture, the 1870s to 1920s was the age of legal formalism, when judges believed that the law was autonomous and logically ordered, and that they mechanically deduced right answers in cases. In the 1920s and 1930s, the story continues, the legal realists discredited this view by demonstrating that the law is marked by gaps and contradictions, arguing that judges construct legal justifications to support desired outcomes. This often-repeated historical account is virtually taken for granted today, and continues to shape understandings about jud
Cataloging source
N$T
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
Beyond the formalist-realist divide : the role of politics in judging, Brian Z. Tamanaha
Label
Beyond the formalist-realist divide : the role of politics in judging, Brian Z. Tamanaha
Link
http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt7rm95
Publication
Related Contributor
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Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Cover; Title; Copyright; Contents; Acknowledgments; 1 Introduction; PART ONE: THE LEGAL FORMALISTS; 2 The Myth about Beliefs in the Common Law; 3 The Myth about "Mechanical Jurisprudence"; 4 The Holes in the Story about Legal Formalism; PART TWO: The Legal Realists; 5 Realism before the Legal Realists; 6 A Reconstruction of Legal Realism; PART THREE: STUDIES OF JUDGING; 7 The Slant in the "Judicial Politics" Field; 8 What Quantitative Studies of Judging Have Found; PART FOUR: LEGAL THEORY; 9 The Emptiness of "Formalism" in Legal Theory; 10 Beyond the Formalist-Realist Divide; Afterword; Notes
http://library.link/vocab/cover_art
https://contentcafe2.btol.com/ContentCafe/Jacket.aspx?Return=1&Type=S&Value=9781282458598&userID=ebsco-test&password=ebsco-test
Dimensions
unknown
http://library.link/vocab/discovery_link
{'f': 'http://opac.lib.rpi.edu/record=b4323753'}
Extent
1 online resource (x, 252 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781282458598
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote

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      110 8th St, Troy, NY, 12180, US
      42.729766 -73.682577
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