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The Resource Assessing Foreign Language Students' Spoken Proficiency : Stakeholder Perspectives on Assessment Innovation

Assessing Foreign Language Students' Spoken Proficiency : Stakeholder Perspectives on Assessment Innovation

Label
Assessing Foreign Language Students' Spoken Proficiency : Stakeholder Perspectives on Assessment Innovation
Title
Assessing Foreign Language Students' Spoken Proficiency
Title remainder
Stakeholder Perspectives on Assessment Innovation
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Series statement
Educational Linguistics Ser.
Series volume
v.26
Assessing Foreign Language Students' Spoken Proficiency : Stakeholder Perspectives on Assessment Innovation
Label
Assessing Foreign Language Students' Spoken Proficiency : Stakeholder Perspectives on Assessment Innovation
Link
http://libproxy.rpi.edu/login?url=https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/rpi/detail.action?docID=4388677
Publication
Copyright
Related Contributor
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Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Foreword -- Acknowledgments -- Contents -- List of Figures -- List of Tables -- Chapter 1: Mediating Assessment Innovation: Why Stakeholder Perspectives Matter -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Background: The Importance of Interaction in Foreign Languages Pedagogy -- 1.2.1 Communicative Language Teaching -- 1.2.2 Communicative Language Testing -- 1.3 Curriculum and Assessment Reforms in New Zealand -- 1.3.1 Overview -- 1.3.2 Implementing Assessment Reform: A Risky Business -- 1.4 Assessment Validation -- 1.4.1 Fundamental Considerations -- 1.4.2 The Contribution of Assessment Score Evidence to a Validity Argument -- 1.4.3 The Limitations of Assessment Score Evidence to a Validity Argument -- 1.4.4 Towards a Broader Understanding of Assessment Validation -- 1.4.5 A Qualitative Perspective on Assessment Validation -- 1.5 The Structure of This Book -- 1.6 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 2: Assessing Spoken Proficiency: What Are the Issues? -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 What Does It Mean to Communicate Proficiently? -- 2.2.1 Communicative Competence as the Underlying Theoretical Framework -- 2.2.2 Developing the Framework of Communicative Competence -- 2.3 Static or Dynamic -- 2.3.1 The Static Assessment Paradigm -- 2.3.2 The Dynamic Assessment Paradigm -- 2.3.3 Static or Dynamic - A Complex Relationship -- 2.4 Task-Based or Construct Based -- 2.4.1 The Centrality of the Task -- 2.4.2 The Importance of the Construct -- 2.5 Single or Paired Performances -- 2.5.1 Single Performance Assessments -- 2.5.2 Paired/Group Performance Assessments -- 2.6 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 3: Introducing a New Assessment of Spoken Proficiency: Interact -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 The New Zealand Landscape for Assessment - A Shifting Environment -- 3.2.1 The 1990s: A Mismatch Between Curricular Aims and High-Stakes Assessment
  • 3.2.2 The NCEA System: The Beginnings of Reform -- 3.2.3 The Impact of Assessment Mismatch on FL Programmes -- 3.2.4 The NCEA for Languages - 2002-2010 -- 3.3 Towards a Learner-Centred Model for High-Stakes Assessment -- 3.3.1 2007: The Advent of a New Curriculum -- 3.3.2 NCEA Mark II -- 3.4 Revising the Assessments for Languages -- 3.4.1 2008: The First SCALEs Meeting -- 3.4.2 2009: The Second SCALEs Meeting -- 3.4.3 2010: A Further Opportunity to Confirm the New Assessments -- 3.4.4 2011 Onwards: Support for the Implementation of Interact -- 3.5 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 4: Investigating Stakeholder Perspectives on Interact -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Bachman and Palmer's Test Usefulness Framework -- 4.2.1 Construct Validity and Reliability -- 4.2.2 Interactiveness, Impact, Practicality and Authenticity -- 4.3 2011 Onwards: Interact in Practice -- 4.4 The Theoretical Usefulness of Interact -- 4.5 A Study into Teachers' and Students' Views -- 4.6 Study Stage I -- 4.6.1 Nationwide Teacher Survey -- 4.6.2 Piloting the Teacher Survey -- 4.6.3 Administering the Main Survey -- 4.6.4 Teacher Interviews -- 4.7 Stage II -- 4.7.1 Teacher Interviews -- 4.7.2 Student Surveys -- 4.8 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 5: The Advantages of Interact -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 The Nationwide Teacher Survey - Section I -- 5.2.1 Overview -- 5.2.2 Perceived Relative Usefulness of Converse and Interact -- 5.2.3 Variations in Teacher Responses -- 5.2.4 Differences in Perception According to Principal Language Taught -- 5.2.5 Differences in Perception According to Whether or Not Using Interact -- 5.3 Advantages of Interact - Survey Data -- 5.3.1 Authenticity and Interactiveness -- 5.3.2 Positive Impact -- 5.3.3 Validity, Reliability and Potential for Washback -- 5.4 Advantages of Interact - Interviews -- 5.4.1 Authenticity and Interactiveness
  • 5.4.2 Positive Impact -- 5.4.3 Validity, Reliability and Potential for Washback -- 5.5 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 6: The Disadvantages of Interact and Suggested Improvements -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Disadvantages of Interact - Survey Data -- 6.2.1 Impracticality -- 6.2.2 Negative Impact - Unrealistic Expectations -- 6.2.3 Negative Impact - Interlocutor Variables -- 6.3 Suggestions for Improvement - Survey Data -- 6.3.1 Reduce the Number of Interactions Required -- 6.3.2 Allow Provision for Scaffolding/Rehearsal -- 6.3.3 Provide More Examples and More Flexible Options -- 6.4 Disadvantages of Interact - Interviews -- 6.4.1 Impracticality -- 6.4.2 Negative Impact - Too Much Work for What It Is Worth -- 6.4.3 Negative Impact - Interlocutor Variables -- 6.4.4 The Challenges of 'Spontaneous and Unrehearsed' -- 6.5 Suggestions for Improvement - Interviews -- 6.5.1 Clarifying 'Spontaneous and Unrehearsed' -- 6.5.2 The Task is Everything -- 6.6 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 7: Interact and Higher Proficiency Students: Addressing the Challenges -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Examples of Task Types -- 7.2.1 Talking About the Environment -- 7.2.2 Mariage Pour Tous -- 7.2.3 Cat Café -- 7.2.4 Getting Students to Take the Lead -- 7.3 Problems Emerging -- 7.3.1 Spontaneous and Unrehearsed -- 7.3.2 Moving Away from Grammar -- 7.4 Back to the Task -- 7.5 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 8: Interact and Higher Proficiency Students: Concluding Perspectives -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Working for Washback -- 8.3 The Student Surveys -- 8.3.1 Section I -- 8.3.2 Taking a Closer Look at the Numbers -- 8.4 Student Survey Responses - Converse -- 8.5 Student Survey Responses - Interact -- 8.5.1 Spontaneity Versus Grammar -- 8.5.2 Types of Task -- 8.5.3 Peer-to-Peer Interactions -- 8.5.4 Working for Washback -- 8.6 Conclusion -- References
  • Chapter 9: Coming to Terms with Assessment Innovation: Conclusions and Recommendations -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Theoretical Underpinnings of Interact -- 9.3 Summary of Findings -- 9.3.1 Overview -- 9.3.2 Positive Dimensions of Assessments Such as Interact -- 9.3.3 Negative Dimensions of Assessments Such as Interact -- 9.4 Static or Dynamic: A Fundamental Problem -- 9.4.1 Is Interact a Test? -- 9.4.2 What Do We Want to Measure? -- 9.5 Where to from Here? -- 9.5.1 Scenario 1 -- 9.5.2 Scenario 2 -- 9.6 Recommendations -- 9.7 Limitations and Conclusion -- References -- Bibliography -- Index
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Dimensions
unknown
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{'f': 'http://opac.lib.rpi.edu/record=b4384830'}
Extent
1 online resource (243 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789811003035
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote

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