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The Resource Able Children in Ordinary Schools

Able Children in Ordinary Schools

Label
Able Children in Ordinary Schools
Title
Able Children in Ordinary Schools
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
First published in 1997. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Able Children in Ordinary Schools
Label
Able Children in Ordinary Schools
Link
http://libproxy.rpi.edu/login?url=https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/rpi/detail.action?docID=1273226
Publication
Copyright
Related Contributor
Related Location
Related Agents
Related Authorities
Related Subjects
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- Acknowledgements -- Preface -- 1: Defining able children -- IQ as a measure of intelligence -- A multi-dimensional view of ability -- The link between ability and achievement -- What makes success -- Innate ability -- Opportunity/support -- Motivation/hard work -- The lessons for schools -- 2: Identification -- Background -- Research implications -- Identification in the secondary school -- Purpose -- Confidentiality -- Identification methods in the secondary school -- 1. Information from primary schools -- 2. Tests -- 3. Teacher nomination -- 4. Classroom observation -- 5. Peer and self-nomination -- 6. Parental nomination -- Summary -- Identification in the primary school -- Stages on the identification continuum -- 1. Awareness of need and value of identification -- 2. Ad hoc identification -- 3. Test-based identification -- 4. School-based systems -- 5. A professional approach -- Identification in the early years -- Early Years Identification at Holyport Ce Primary School -- Able children with special educational needs -- Specific learning difficulties (dyslexic able children) -- Physical disabilities and sensory impairments -- Emotional and behavioural difficulties -- Identification: conclusions -- 1. Definition and identification are closely linked -- 2. Testing alone cannot provide the answer -- 3. Able pupils are not a clearly defined group -- 4. Some abilities may not be recognized until later in a pupil's schooling -- 5. Ability and achievement are not the same thing -- 6. Opportunities and motivation make a difference -- 7. Identification and classroom provision -- 3: A differentiated approach to classroom planning -- Introduction -- Differentiation: where should it occur and what does it look like? -- Differentiation: planning and opportunism
  • Including extension in classroom planning -- 1. Must, should, could -- 2. Skills, concepts, content, resources -- The model for extension planning -- Who should do extension? -- Methods of establishing a starting point (diagnostic assessment) -- 1. 'Carpet time' or classroom questions -- 2. Class brainstorm -- 3. Setting an open task -- School example 1 -- School example 2 -- School example 3 -- 4. Concept mapping -- 5. Quiz -- 6. Pre-test or assessment -- 7. Building on existing evidence -- Summary -- Teaching and learning styles -- 1. Open-ended task for all -- 2. Workrate -- 3. Tasks by ability group -- 4. Starting from the core -- 5. Individually negotiated tasks -- 6. Core plus options -- Summary -- Creating challenge -- Twenty possible ways to create challenge in the classroom -- 1. Plan/do/review -- 2. Working from difficult text -- 3. Using a range of text or information -- Example -- 4. Recording in an unusual way -- Example -- 5. Role play -- 6. Problem-solving and enquiry tasks -- Example -- Example 1 -- Example 2 -- Example 3 -- 7. Choice in how to handle content -- 8. Decision making -- Example -- 9. No correct answer -- 10. Give the answer, they set the question -- 11. Using one text or artefact -- 12. Allowing pupils to do the planning -- 13. Time-restricted activities -- Example -- 14. Developing metacognition -- 15. Blooms higher order thinking -- 16. Study skills, using DARTS -- 17. Introducing technical language -- 18. Modelling experts -- 19. Philosophy -- 20. Book talk -- Summary -- 4: Classroom provision -- Introduction -- Pace -- High teacher expectation -- Poor assessment of individuals' capabilities -- Lack of clarity about learning outcomes -- Assumptions based on gender or class -- Desire to ensure that no child fails -- Lack of differentiation -- A focus on curriculum access at the expense of high achievement
  • Classroom management and teacher time -- Classroom layout and management -- Use of adults -- Teacher explanation and questioning -- Marking and evaluation -- Resources -- Whole-class teaching -- Who does extension? -- Learning outcomes -- Summary -- 5: Issues for secondary schools -- Introduction -- The school culture -- Effective schools and able pupils -- Commitment -- A school policy for able pupils -- Example -- Organizational systems -- Fast-tracking -- Streaming -- Setting -- Mixed-ability teaching -- Whole-school opportunities -- Roles and responsibilities -- The coordinator for able pupils -- The Programme for More Able Children at The Henry Box School -- Faculty or subject departments -- Individual teachers make a difference -- Case Study. Susan Blake, Didcot Girls School, Oxfordshire -- Some approaches used to create challenge for more able pupils in English Years 7-13 -- Summary -- 6: Issues for primary schools -- Introduction -- Commitment -- Policy -- Staff responsibilities for able pupil provision -- Able child coordinator -- Holyport CE Primary School -- Able Child Coordinator -- St Anne's CEVC School -- Curriculum Job Leader Description: Humanities (History, Geography, Environmental Education, International Education) -- Purpose -- General Responsibilities -- Review -- Whole-school systems for managing and monitoring provision -- Staff development and deployment -- School documentation -- Medium- and short-term planning -- Monitoring of individuals (individual education plans) -- Assessment -- Example -- Resources -- Finance -- Monitoring and reporting -- Whole-school opportunities which enrich and extend -- Regular activities at whole-school level -- School-wide initiatives -- Visitors to school -- Educational trips -- Clubs and societies -- Competitions -- Withdrawal activities -- Who to withdraw and for what?
  • Making the most of withdrawal opportunities -- Purpose -- Content -- Planning and evaluation -- Summary -- Appendix 1: Writing a policy for the more able -- Appendix 2: Marston Middle School, Oxford: policy for able pupils -- 1. Statement of philosophy -- 2. Definition -- 3. Identification -- 4. Strategies -- 4.1 Institutional level -- 4.2 In the classroom -- 4.3 Out of the classroom -- 5. Monitoring the effectiveness of this policy -- The Marked Aptitudes Grid -- Bibliography -- Index
http://library.link/vocab/cover_art
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Dimensions
unknown
http://library.link/vocab/discovery_link
{'f': 'http://opac.lib.rpi.edu/record=b4406173'}
Extent
1 online resource (292 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781134092987
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote

Library Locations

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      110 8th St, Troy, NY, 12180, US
      42.729766 -73.682577
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