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The Resource A Longitudinal Approach to Family Trajectories in France : The Generations and Gender Survey

A Longitudinal Approach to Family Trajectories in France : The Generations and Gender Survey

Label
A Longitudinal Approach to Family Trajectories in France : The Generations and Gender Survey
Title
A Longitudinal Approach to Family Trajectories in France
Title remainder
The Generations and Gender Survey
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Series statement
INED Population Studies
Series volume
v.7
A Longitudinal Approach to Family Trajectories in France : The Generations and Gender Survey
Label
A Longitudinal Approach to Family Trajectories in France : The Generations and Gender Survey
Link
http://libproxy.rpi.edu/login?url=https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/rpi/detail.action?docID=4877875
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Copyright
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Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Acknowledgements -- Contents -- Contributors -- Chapter 1: Introduction. Following the Same People Over Time to Better Understand Family Behaviour and Its Consequences -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Why Interview the Same People Several Times? -- 1.3 Two Main Approaches for Longitudinal Analysis -- 1.3.1 A Better Understanding of Family Trajectories{u2026} -- 1.3.2 {u2026} and Analysis of Their Consequences -- 1.4 Towards New Uses and New Data -- References -- Chapter 2: Implementation of the GGS Survey in France -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 The French GGS as Part of an International Project -- 2.2.1 Overview of the Generations and Gender Programme (GGP) -- 2.2.1.1 A Longitudinal Survey Reflecting the Methodological Choices of the GGP -- 2.2.1.2 A Harmonized Questionnaire, Similar in All Three Waves -- 2.2.1.3 Contextualization to Enhance Comparisons -- 2.2.2 Progress of the International Project: Overambitious Goals for Some Countries -- 2.2.2.1 A Large Number of Participating Countries -- 2.2.2.2 Some Caveats -- 2.3 The French Survey: Looking Back on 6 Years of Data Collection -- 2.3.1 The First Survey Wave -- 2.3.1.1 Scope, Statistical Unit and Number of Participants -- 2.3.1.2 Characteristics of Data Collection in Wave 1 -- 2.3.2 From One Wave to Another, History Repeats Itself -- 2.3.2.1 A Similar Questionnaire from One Wave to Another -- 2.3.2.2 A Similar Data Collection Protocol in All Waves -- 2.3.3 Attrition, Representativeness and Data Quality -- 2.3.3.1 Regular Contact with Respondents Between the Waves{u2026} -- 2.3.3.2 {u2026} But an Attrition Rate of 43% -- 2.3.3.3 GGS Survey Representativeness Across the Waves -- 2.3.3.4 Data Quality and Inconsistency of Responses Across Waves -- 2.4 Conclusion -- Appendix: French providers of funding for the different waves of the ERFI-GGS survey (2005, 2008 and 2011) -- References
  • Chapter 3: Conjugal Outcomes of Different Types of Non-{u00AD}cohabiting Relationships -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Data, Preliminary Controls and Methods of Analysis -- 3.2.1 Identifying Individuals "Living Neither Alone Nor with a Partner" in the GGS -- 3.2.2 The Four Typical Profiles Constructed on the Basis of the First Survey Wave -- 3.2.3 The Impact of Attrition on the Study of LAT Relationships -- 3.2.4 Method -- 3.3 Results -- 3.3.1 Conjugal Outcomes of LAT Relationships 3 and 6 Years Later -- 3.3.2 What Outcome for Which Characteristics? -- 3.3.3 All Other Things Being Equal -- 3.4 Conclusion -- Appendix -- References -- Chapter 4: Frequency of Disagreements, Satisfaction in Couples, and Separations -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Data and Method -- 4.2.1 Construction of Models -- 4.2.2 Longitudinal Data -- 4.2.3 The Problem of Attrition -- 4.3 Subjects of Disagreement and Self-Reported Perceptions of the Couple in 2005 -- 4.3.1 Subjects of Disagreement and Respondents' Reactions -- 4.3.2 Disagreements, Managing Disagreements and Link with Perception of the Couple -- 4.4 Link Between Disagreements, Perception of the Couple, and Separations Based on Longitudinal Data -- 4.4.1 Socio-demographic Characteristics and the Risk of Separation -- 4.4.1.1 Characteristics of the Union -- 4.4.1.2 Children and Stepchildren -- 4.4.1.3 Social Heterogamy -- 4.4.2 Disagreements, Satisfaction with the Relationship, and the Risk of Separation -- 4.5 Conclusion -- Appendices -- Appendix 1: Sample Size in the Models -- Appendix 2: Quality of Data. Separations and Attrition Test -- Appendix 3: Attrition for the Variables of Interest -- Appendix 4: Logistic Regressions Modelling (1) Satisfaction with the Relationship and (2) the Fact of Having Thought About a Separation -- References -- Chapter 5: Birth Planning: Measures and Associated Factors -- 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Data and Methodological Considerations -- 5.2.1 Birth Planning in the French GGS -- 5.2.2 Coverage of the Study -- 5.2.3 The Effect of Attrition on the Prevalence of Birth Planning -- 5.3 Changes in Birth Planning Since 1970 -- 5.3.1 Stabilization Since the Mid-1980s -- 5.3.2 How Reliable Are Retrospective Data? -- 5.4 Stable Mean Prevalence but Frequent Changes in Responses -- 5.4.1 Comparison of Prevalence in 2008 and 2011 for Births Between 2005 and 2008 -- 5.4.2 Unstable Responses -- 5.4.2.1 A Third of Respondents Did Not Give the Same Response for a Given Birth in 2008 and in 2011 -- 5.4.2.2 Response in 2011 by Response 3 Years Earlier -- 5.4.3 Profiles of Respondents Who Gave Differing Responses -- 5.5 Some Characteristics of Poorly Planned Births -- 5.5.1 Descriptive Analysis -- 5.5.2 Multivariate Analysis -- 5.6 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 6: Non-realization of Fertility Intentions -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Initial Childbearing Intentions, Project Realization and Redefinition -- 6.2.1 Diverse Trajectories Between Intention and Realization -- 6.2.2 Realization of Fertility Plans Closely Linked to Strength of Intention and Number of Children Previously Born -- 6.3 Factors Involved in the Non-realization of "Positive" Fertility Intentions -- 6.3.1 Living with a Partner, an Essential Prerequisite -- 6.3.2 The First Birth is as Frequent as the Second Among Cohabiting Couples -- 6.3.3 Characteristics of Individuals Who Postponed or Did Not Realize Their Fertility Intentions -- 6.4 Factors Involved in the Non-realization of "Negative" Fertility Intentions -- 6.5 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 7: The Impact of Unemployment on the Realization of Fertility Intentions -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Data and Method -- 7.2.1 Information Available from the Survey -- 7.2.2 Scope of the Study -- 7.2.3 Methods
  • 7.3 Fertility Intentions and Realization by Employment Status -- 7.3.1 The Unemployed Less Frequently Intend to Become a Parent Within 3 Years -- 7.3.2 Less Frequent Realization of Fertility Intentions Among Respondents Who Were Childless and Unemployed in the First Wave -- 7.3.3 A Period of Unemployment After the First Survey Wave Delays the Realization of Fertility Intentions -- 7.4 More Qualified Results, "All Other Things Being Equal" -- 7.4.1 Unemployment Delays the Birth of a First Child -- 7.4.2 But Unemployment Does Not Delay the Birth of a Subsequent Child -- 7.5 Conclusion -- Appendices -- Appendix 1 -- Appendix 2 -- References -- Chapter 8: Work Schedules and Family Life: How Does the Birth of Children Weigh in the Balance? -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Employment Status and Work Schedules -- 8.2.1 Women's Labour Force Participation Depends on the Number and Age of Their Children -- 8.2.2 Women with Several Dependent Children Are More Often in Part-Time Work -- 8.2.3 Looking at the Organization of Work Schedules in Terms of Times Generally Worked -- 8.2.3.1 Responses to the Question on Times Generally Worked -- 8.2.3.2 A Definition of Work Schedules -- 8.2.3.3 The Main Characteristics of Individuals According to Their Work Schedules -- 8.2.4 Work-Life Balance and the Role of Work Schedules -- 8.3 Changes in Employment Status and Work Schedules -- 8.3.1 Comparing Situations at Three Dates -- 8.3.2 After a Birth, Women More Frequently Changed Their Employment Status Between 2005 and 2008 -- 8.3.3 Changes in Work Schedule Between 2005 and 2008 -- 8.3.4 Changes for Individuals in Employment in 2005 After the Birth of a Child Between 2005 and 2008 -- 8.3.4.1 More Frequent Changes in Work Schedule for People with Atypical Hours -- 8.3.4.2 More Frequent Changes for Women by Birth Order, but Rarely Concerning Work Schedules
  • 8.3.4.3 Changes Vary According to Household Characteristics and Level of Support from Friends and Family -- 8.3.5 Births as a Factor in Occupational Changes? -- 8.4 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 9: Parental Leave and Career Interruption of Mothers in France and Hungary -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Data, Methods and Definitions -- 9.3 Massive Parental Leave Take-Up in Hungary After a Birth{u2026} -- 9.4 {u2026}And at Least Up to the Child's Third Birthday -- 9.4.1 Greater Impact of Birth Order on the Duration of Career Interruption in France Than in Hungary -- 9.4.2 Having Worked Before the Birth Is a Decisive Factor in Both Countries -- 9.4.3 Relatively Little Impact of Policy Changes on the Return to Employment -- 9.4.4 Mothers with Higher Educational Levels Enter the Job Market Faster -- 9.5 Which Factors Have the Greatest Influence on Duration of Inactivity? -- 9.6 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 10: The Impact of Life Stages on Parent-Child Transfers -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 Family Transfers and Life Course Events in the French GGS -- 10.3 The Lifecycle and Received Transfers: Cross-Sectional Analysis -- 10.4 Life Stages and Received Transfers: A Multivariate Analysis of Panel Data -- 10.5 Conclusion -- Appendix -- References -- Chapter 11: Changes in Demand for Paid Domestic Help -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 Who Makes Use of Paid Domestic Help? -- 11.2.1 Main Factors and Hypotheses -- 11.2.2 A Minority Behaviour Mainly Dependent on Age and Income -- 11.3 What Changed Between 2005 and 2011? -- 11.3.1 Can We Detect an Increase in Demand? -- 11.3.2 Frequent Changes in Situation -- 11.3.3 Which Events Trigger Demand? -- 11.4 Conclusion -- Appendix -- References -- Chapter 12: The Impact of Women's Family Trajectories on Their Value Systems -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.1.1 A Common Simplification of Family Trajectories
  • 12.1.2 The Impact of Family Trajectories on the Perception of Gender Inequality
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9783319560014
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